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A Practical Guide to Northern Waters Smokehaus: Samples, Part 1

I have been mulling over the concept of a “Practical Guide to the Smokehaus” for a few months now. The task is daunting. It requires a vastness and depth of focus that could end up too vague or underdeveloped, and a precision of information that could lead us to conclusions that are not necessarily earned—a bunch of disconnected data gathered from anecdotes and opinions, leaving everyone wondering “why should I care about this?” As the weaver of this web, I find the task of creating a concise and comprehensive guide to your Northern Waters Smokehaus experience beyond my present resources and abilities. So, a thought occurred to me: I could save myself a great deal of concern over quality of output, I could generate a steady stream of content in digestible morsels, I could use this marketing-based writing as a means to connect with my co-workers and fellow human-beings; I could make it a weekly column, and I could get real answers to a variety of frequently asked questions from my esteemed colleagues. What follows is my first attempt:

“What goes well with this?” “Could you make a sample platter with the best stuff?” “What should I get?”

These are but a few of the daunting questions my co-workers and I engage with every day in the deli. I usually default to asking customers what they tend to like, then customizing my recommendations based on their response and my knowledge of our products. This doesn’t always work out. I am human and sometimes my preferences don’t line up with the customer’s. Sometimes the customer just wants someone else to do the thinking for them (which is very valid, and to which I often relate). And sometimes it is best just to judge by taste.

Today’s topic: The ideal sample-platter. (Note: complex sample platters at Northern Waters Smokehaus will still be made primarily at our employees’ discretion, but you are always welcome to sample individual finished products.)

“What would be on your ideal sample platter?” This is the question I asked my co-workers. Given the time and resources to prepare an inspiring combination of flavors or a greatest hits-style spread to share with our customers, what end result would we see, by each deli employee.

Leif “Pork loin Squealy Dan samples. No, wait. That sounds like a lot of work. I don’t want everyone to come in expecting me to have those prepared,” At this time, I assured him that this is just a thought-experiment, and that he wouldn’t be required to make these, though we discuss whether to make them as sandwiches that are then slivered into samples, individually assembled/toasted open-face sandwich bites, or topped saltine crackers. We also discuss deep-fried saltine crackers—unrelated. “Oh, and I changed my mind: They’d be porketta Squealy Dans.”

Michael — Michael had just finished telling me about why salmon tails are his favorite product we carry, when I sprung this second question on him: “Tails, pancetta, a mix of the salumi, and a Jerry bread [Jerry bakes several of our breads in-haus],” Which kind of Jerry bread? “Definitely the rye.”

Hyland — “Saucisson sec with slices of pear or apple or cucumber. And a really nutty Brie.” Cele: You’re a really nutty brie. “Your mom’s a really nutty Brie,” Cele: No she’s not. She’s a really nutty T—. “I’d also put out castel vetrano olives.”

Cele — “Olivada, chèvre, pork loin, salamini, cajun salmon and black pepper salmon,” Any crackers? “Yea. Ritz. Because we’re fancy.”

Lucy — “Probably ham, pepperoni, saucisson, traditional [salmon] and bread.” Lucy grew up around Northern Waters Smokehaus food, and offered that the glue of this hypothetical sample platter is nostalgia for her childhood. She didn’t say that exactly. I am just trying to paraphrase her poetically.

Jacob — As I described my task, a light brightened behind Jacob’s eyes: “I already know what I’d make. ‘Lutheran Sushi’ — Is that offensive?” For those who don’t already know, Lutheran Sushi is a term which I am not going to research the origin of at this moment, but which I have come to understand as sliced meat, spackled with a binding condiment and wrapped around a pickle spear. When pressed on his preferred variety, he replied, “Pork loin, for sure. With mayo.”

Sam — “Hedonist bites. Saltine crackers spread with a bite of country pâté, a dab of mayo and mustard, a slice of onion, and a cornichon pickle slice. They’re great for tipping people who are on the fence about country pâté or the hedonist.”

In the spirit of not making my co-workers bear the entire burden of producing content, I’ll give my take on the week’s subject at the end:

Ned — “I sure hope we continue carrying our Sogn Tomme cheese,” This is my inner-monologue. “I had no idea what it was before we started selling it,” It’s a fatty, crumbly sheep’s milk cheese. “But I sure enjoyed the time I served it with smoked Alaskan King Salmon and blueberries, drizzled in honey, atop Carr’s water crackers.” This inner monologue is extrapolated from my frenzied mental short-hand.

From here on out, y’all can expect these practical guides on a variety of subjects, returning to some topics (like this) to eventually document all of my co-workers’ suggestions, and musing on new ideas as they occur. Hopefully, you’ll receive sagely advice from myself and my co-workers to guide you through your NWS experience, inspire you to try something new, or enhance your old favorites.

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5 Things- Partners in Crime

We don’t actually commit crimes, so cool it! Unless you consider the delicious products that we produce out of our tiny space here in Canal Park’s Dewitt Seitz building to be criminally good? Understandable! But I would posit that it would be a crime NOT to enjoy our amazing, hand-made delicacies and to nourish your loved ones with them. Perhaps it is YOU who is skirting legality? Don’t worry. Your secret is safe with us. If you can live with what you’ve done, so be it.

So, now that we’ve established that it’s completely legal for us to delight your palate with smoky and savory treats. But what happens when we partner with other fantastic businesses to bring you new ways to enjoy our products? Could this possibly be legal? Is it even ethical to bring this much pleasure and happiness to people in our community? Do we have any sense of propriety at all? We don’t know. But if you want to dive into this ethical quandary yourself, here’s a list of a few of our partners in the community who are not only doing wonderful things on their own, but also doing wonderful things with our products. We’re incredibly lucky to live in a community in which people take immense pride in the work that they do, and we feel honored that they think highly enough of us to include us in their schemes.

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The New Scenic Cafe– Owner and Executive Chef Scott Graden took over operations at this by now legendary North Shore restaurant in 1999. Graden and crew quickly garnered a reputation for doing upscale food that was approachable, but undeniably elevated. The region really had never really seen a restaurant that combined The New Scenic’s funky and bohemian space with food that was far-thinking and forward-reaching. Nestled just North of Duluth on Highway 61, the Scenic offers breathtaking views of Lake Superior, as well as carefully appointed outdoor spaces for special events or just to relax with a drink. They even have a yurt! Graden and our own Eric Goerdt have been friends for years, and their mutual admiration/friendly rivalry have taken food at both of our establishments to new heights. The New Scenic has featured several of the Smokehaus’ production items, from our German-style bratwurst to smoked whitefish- and whatever Graden does with our outstanding products elevates them considerably. The menu at The New Scenic is ever changing and seasonally geared, but there are some items so good that they make the menu year-round. One of my personal favorites, the Tuna Sashimi Taco, has been on the menu for several years, but still seems fresh and innovative. The New Scenic is at the head of the pack for a Duluth fine dining experience, and is not to be missed.

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Lake Superior Beach Club– This is the newest venture dreamed up by the staff at Duluth’s Glensheen Mansion. Lake Superior Beach Club will be just east of the existing pier, and this area will have lawn games, board games on picnic tables, menus for food delivery (hint hint) and a cash bar with beer and wine. Glensheen is partnering with Northern Waters Smokehaus for a special event this summer (can’t reveal too many details just yet) and hopefully continuing on into the infinite future. Whether you are meeting new friends at the long community table, enjoying a bonfire (the only place that you can have a fire on the beach in Duluth), or walking the estate to take in the gardens- this pristine spot right on the shores of Lake Superior is not to be missed. If the spectacular sunset that I saw there last night is any indication, this spot will soon be jumpin’ for the rest of the summer.

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Zeitgeist Arts Cafe– Here’s an insider tip: Chef Taylor Peterson, Head Chef at Zeitgeist, used to be the chef at the Smokehaus’ short-lived Northern Waters Restaurant. Taylor also spent several years in the heart of the Smokehaus’ production crew, cranking out the delicious sundries that fuel our sandwich empire. Chef Taylor specializes in classic fare with a twist, but never denigrates his menus into the played-out ‘modern comfort food’ trap. Taylor is a master at execution who demands top-quality ingredients, and his time here at the Smokehaus is credited with informing his palate, along with bringing his culinary creativity to new heights.  You can find a smattering of Smokehaus products throughout Zeitgeist’s menu (a few of which may have migrated from Northern Waters Restaurant’s menu), but the place that they really shine is in their weekend brunch menu. Smokehaus Mexican Chorizo really sings in the sublime Chorizo and Eggs; with pickled red onion, cilantro, crispy tortilla and beans & rice. With a full and carefully appointed bar at your disposal and a menu of  forward-thinking yet classic dishes, you can really make brunch a worthy occasion. But, no matter the time of day you dine at  Zeitgeist, the order of the day is always great ingredients prepared simply.

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Grassroots Gourmet- Located in Minneapolis’ Midtown Neighborhood (and right inside of the Midtown Global Market (!), a deep discussion topic for another time), Grassroots Gourmet has the distinction of being the first place in the Twin Cities Metro area that offered Smokehaus products to our rabid (and rapidly growing) fan base there. Grassroots Gourmet is a locally sourced grocery store and deli with grab and go lunch items, ranging from fresh produce to preserved items. I can tell you from experience that the selection in their cases is a revelation in local cheese- and what a locality to draw from!  The quantity (and quality) of Minnesotan, Wisconsin and Iowan cheese in the last 5 years has absolutely exploded, and Grass Roots patrons definitely benefit from this. We have been humbled by the amount of people in the Twin Cities that have let us know how happy they are to buy our smoked salmon so close to their home. It feels great to know that people a couple of hours south can enjoy a taste of the North Shore whenever they want to. Even if you’re not getting Smokehaus salmon at the market, you will be sure to find something locally sourced and loved with which to make any meal truly special.

Brew Dogs– Is there anyplace in the US that is experiencing a bigger explosion of local breweries than Minnesota? Not only is there a new place opening up seemingly every month, but the quality of the beer being produced is really second to none. Duluth is no exception, with the amazing Hoops and Earth Rider (technically across the bridge in WI, but whatever) opening just within the last year, along with market powerhouses Bent Paddle and Castle Danger, the niche-and-loving-it Blacklist Brewing downtown and the far flung Lake Superior Brewing simultaneously holding court in West End while also holding down the distinction of being Minnesota’s oldest microbrewery. I’m a beer loving man through and through, tried and true, so you can imagine what a paradise this is for someone like me. But what could make sucking down cold suds even better? Snacks! NWS is at the forefront of delivering smoked fish, charcuterie, cheese, sandwiches… whatever you would like, to select breweries. The only criteria is that they have to be close enough to make delivery feasible AND they have to make delicious beer. All of these breweries currently make delicious beer, but proximity-wise Lake Superior Brewing, Hoops Brewing, Bent Paddle, Earth Rider and Blacklist make the cut. Beer heads from all over are raving about these breweries, so if you’re in Duluth and are hungry and thirsty, you could be completely dialed with a one stop shop.

 

 

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Cajun Finn – The Inside Story

The humble beginnings of a Titan among sandwiches

The Cajun Finn is our most popular sandwich by far – we outsell our second most popular sandwich (The Cold Turkey) by nearly double the amount of Cajun Finns. Invented early on in our deli life – around 2004 – the sandwich began as many of recipes did – with the help of customers and the use of ingredients that happened to be around.

Regular customer, dream pop superstar, and all around cool guy Al Sparhawk happened to be in the shop to purchase his favorite at the time, Smoked Atlantic Cajun Salmon. Eric asked if Al wanted to try a sandwich, and Al and Eric basically improvised until they came up with a fairly cohesive mish-mash of the ingredients we had for the purpose of experimentation, including pepperoncini (Eric had a huge hot pepper faze), roasted red peppers (because ripe tomato season is too damn short in Northeast MN), and wild leek cream cheese (I wish we could still make this, but we’d have to hire a team of licensed foragers to bag up an airplane-hanger’s worth every season to keep up with demand).  A sprinkling of greens and a freshly-baked stirato later and before you could say “The Great Destroyer” a wonderful sandwich was born.

Variations on the sandwich have included double cream cheese, no cream cheese/add mustard, add bison pastrami (Affectionately called “The Big Diaper”) and of course the celebrated jean jacket – adding Sriracha and cilantro. But the original recipe, invented on the fly to please a regular, is still a peppery, smoky, sweet, and spicy sandwich that is hard to beat.

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How to Survive a Summer Line at Northern Waters Smokehaus

By Ned Netzel, Frontline Force, Musician, Sandwich Inventor

Dig, if you will, a picture of yourself entering Dewitt-Seitz Marketplace for the first time. It is a sunny, hot summer day, and you have just spent the last fifteen minutes searching for a parking spot or “bridged.” Your GPS has sent you on what seems like a wild goose- *ahem* salmon-chase, but finally you arrive at our shop—perhaps you first heard of us while watching our segment on Diners, Drive-Ins & Dives (filmed during our more idle days)—and after entering through the modestly-labelled “exit” door (appropriate only while wearing a raspberry beret) are asked to head to the back of what appears to be a line all the way through the building. Trust me: Those of us making sandwiches behind the counter are just as terrified as you. And those of us behind the deli cases feel for you. Now that we’ve acknowledged the mutual trepidation, I would like to lay out a (fingers crossed) concise guide to improving your experience, and that of your fellow patrons, at our establishment.

The “Flow” of our shop

This section is not about our talented designer, “Flo;” it is about the best way to navigate our tiny shop. A somewhat superficially confusing interior design element of our shop is that the checkout register is directly next to the exit door. Allow me to explain why this works best for everyone in three short points: First, it allows us to direct our line down through the building in such a manner that it neither clogs the hallway, nor blocks the entrance to our amazing neighbors, Lake Avenue Café . Secondly, it allows us to divide our tiny (even at two-times the size it was just 3 years ago) shop into an initial grocery/deliberation section, an ordering/payment section, and a final waiting/dining section. If this path is followed, the line will move steadily and your likeliness of feeling stuck in line will decrease greatly. Order grocery items, ask questions, and contemplate your sandwich order before the register; place sandwich orders at the register; prepare to be amazed after the register. My awesome (see: helpful, hilarious) coworkers and I are always there to help with the process, but you, dear reader, shall no longer be dependent on them.
Pro-tip: If you know exactly what you want, try ordering from our pickup/delivery department. You can even order online!

 

Interacting with Our Staff

Everyone in our shop is either human or service animal, so miscommunication is inevitable, but our staff is trained to do everything in our power to provide you with excellent service. Here are a few things you should feel free to ask of us, if we haven’t already offered them:

An Italiensk sandwich from Northern Waters Smokehaus
• Menus. 99%* of the time we have them available for our deli & catering department. You can take them with you or leave them once you’re finished. If you have your smartphone or tablet with you, all of the menus are available on our website. *This is one of  85% of all statistics made up on-the-spot for the purposes of this article.

• Samples. In an ideal world, we have curated samples for you already. In reality, sometimes the line and the long hours have us focused on figuring out what you want and getting it to you in a timely manner. This is your invitation to ask for samples. You have graced our shop with your patronage (or, in other words, waited in a long line to get there), so we would like you to leave with zero surprises about whether you’re getting what you want. With a few exceptions –  mostly frozen goods –  our products are available for sampling. All we ask is that you are respectful of your fellow customers. More on this in the next section, but as always, we are available to help guide the procession.
• Advice. Listen, our shop may be very small, but it can be overwhelming. The staff at NWS will never take for granted that you share our detailed knowledge of our products (shout out to the repeat customers and regulars who do, but there’s no expectation). The sandwich board alone merits hours of analysis (and aesthetic appreciation, shout out again to the phenomenal Flo). Ask us about our favorite sandwiches/deli items, customer favorites, pro-tips, and pairing recommendations. My coworkers and I are not robots, but due to the nature of the work, we often find ourselves repeating actions and phrases throughout the day. When engaged in a friendly manner, we at NWS are among the most thoughtful, funny, and helpful customer service representatives you’ll ever meet, and we love the food we prepare. It bears repeating that we feel for those of you who wait in long lines to experience our amazing products.

Interacting with your fellow customers

Please allow me to editorialize for a minute:
So many of us walk through the world in fear of those around us, or plagued by our own anxieties and problems. Have you ever found yourself feeling lost or alone in a sea of people? Humans are social creatures, yet so much that goes on in the world can isolate us, alienate us, or upset our carefully crafted and protected comfort zones. This isn’t wrong, by any means, but it is sad. Human existence is a strange and beautiful thing, and each person has a unique perspective on the world, yet it can be very easy to allow our joy and wonderment at our environment to become anger and annoyance.
With that said, the best advice I can offer you for surviving the long summer lines at NWS is to engage your fellow customers. Perhaps the person in front of you is ordering a month’s worth of deli items and you only want to order a few sandwiches: ask them if it’s alright to pass them and order. Our staff is used to facilitating these interactions, but we are not always able to. Perhaps you are new to our establishment and the person in front of you is a veteran Smokehauser: ask them if they have any recommendations. Take a look at our Trip Advisor reviews to find that we have passionate and knowledgeable customers. If I know anything about humans, it is that we love to talk about the things we like (guilty as charged: ask me about my favorite music sometime—probably not in the NWS line, although I have occasionally jotted down music recommendations for customers when I thought they would be valued. Maybe I’ll write a future blog post about music culture at NWS. I’ll have to check with my superiors first).
Share your light with your fellow customers, and be a mirror to reflect theirs. We’re all in this together.

Miscellaneous tips

*Have a locally crafted beer with your meal. Our shop can’t sell alcohol, but our neighbors at  Lake Avenue Café have a wonderful bar (a staff favorite post-shift haunt) and a liquor license that extends to the front deck and the tables in the hallway. Get your sandwich wrapped to-go or in a basket (which we trust you will return to us), grab a drink from Lake Avenue Café, and enjoy an exquisite meal in the sunshine of our shared patio.
• Feel as if you have waited long enough in line? Get something from our grab’n’go case and skip the wait for your sandwich, or have the deli staff make you a fish basket, which is typically ready by the time you get to the register. And of course, if lines aren’t your thing, here’s another reminder that you can place delivery and pickup orders online.
• Take it all in. Since we expanded our shop in 2014, we have put a ton of work into making NWS an aesthetically pleasing experience, from the smell and taste of smoked meats, fish and charcuterie, to the visual splendor of the hand-designed sandwich menu, to the serve-yourself nature of a number of our available grocery items, even to the music playing to keep our staff and guests dancing and smiling through the workday.
• Our pickup department has their own door, located in the alleyway between  our building and Duluth Pack. Our phone number is painted on the door next to it, and all you have to do to skip our voice menu and reach the pickup department is press 1. Unfortunately, due to the heavy volume of customers in our shop, if you want to order additional items once you arrive, you’ll have to wait in line. If you find yourself in this position, please refer to our wonderful How to Survive a Summer Line at Northern Waters Smokehaus guide.

If you have any further questions about the best way to experience our shop, I’m not surprised. I have worked at NWS for a few years, and I still learn things about our shop and sandwiches every shift. Just know that we’re happy you’re here for us, and we’ll do our best to be there for you.



P.S. If you noticed the Prince allusions at the beginning of this guide, I love you and you are part of what is right with this world. Try the Purple Range sandwich: A quarter pound of pastrami, cabbage, pepperoncini and red onion on a Crayo-spackled hero roll.

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Spring Pasta with Smoked Salmon Recipe

What could be more appropriate to the weather tug-of-war that is Springtime in Duluth, MN than an ample plate of pasta festooned with smoked salmon?  Recently, while filtering through an inbox of email nonsense (due Friday? How about next Monday?) a thrilling word was on a subject line: *( and Rosé) – and we knew a new smoked salmon recipe was in order.

Humans, we made it through another winter. There’s something in the air — maybe it’s the sudden sunlight and early storms? Maybe it’s the oomph in people’s steps? Let’s just say we are starting to dream about Rosé.

Whatever your reason might be, we are eager to sip, cook with friends and relax.

The cocktail recipe inspired us to make something light and citrusy. We paired our favorite Haus-smoked salmon with an affordable, fresh and fruity Rosé (we substituted  a bottle of sparkling Rosé for La Vieille Ferme 2015 ).
* If you don’t have a bottle of St. Germain liqueur just laying around in your house, the chilled Rosé is still quite the treat.

However, that liquor is like liquid gold. Use it today, use it tomorrow, use it forever.

 

Ingredients

½ lb Smoked Alaskan sockeye salmon, cubed

1/2 Shallot, diced

4 Cloves of garlic, diced

1 T Cracked black pepper

1/2 Lemon, zested and juiced

1 C Fresh parsley, chopped

10 Asparagus stalks

228 g (two servings worth) Dry angel hair pasta

Canola oil or olive oil for cooking

Salt to taste

3 T Butter  

4 T (¼ cup) of White wine (Sauvignon Blanc works great. It’s light, dry, herbal & floral, which will create a nice dimension).

 

Directions –

After getting your mise en place all ready (aka prepping your ingredients), get  salted water boiling and cook pasta al dente, strain, toss in 1 T (or so – enough to prevent sticking) olive oil. Save 2 Tablespoons of pasta water –  the gluten will be useful for the sauce.

Heat 1 T of oil and 1 T of butter over medium-high heat. Lightly salt and cook the asparagus until they are nearly tender, 4-5 minutes. Remove the asparagus and set them aside for later. We want the asparagus to be a little undercooked here because we will be adding them back in later.

If the pan seems dry, add a little bit of olive oil to the same pan and sweat shallots over medium heat until they are nearly translucent. Add another 1 T of butter and add the garlic and salmon. Cook, stirring, for a few minutes to combine flavors.

Add  wine and the pasta water you saved. Add the rest of your ingredients (black pepper, lemon zest and juice). Toss in the asparagus and add another tablespoon of butter. Let your ingredients simmer for about 5-7 minutes until the sauce reduces and becomes slightly thickened and reduced.


Toss in the pasta and add the fresh parsley. Mix and serve!

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Northern Bagel Sandwich Kit

Some food bites transport you.

 

Creamy whipped scallion cream cheese, perfectly smoked, flakey Traditional Salmon and a golden (with a slight hint of sweetness) Lake Superior Bakehouse Bagel.

Can you remember the anticipation while waiting in line?

Can you remember the list of to-dos and must-sees while visiting the western tip of Lake Superior?

Do you remember avoiding making eye contact with the Seagulls (or lake birds)?

 

 

This May, we will help transport you to the unsalted sea. You can bring a friend along and share a Northern Bagel anywhere in the United States.
No luggage required. 

Coming Soon

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Eggs Three-Way (or this is not a pipe)

Each of the following recipes are good for 6 eggs, or a dozen deviled eggs.

 

Smoked Lake Superior Lake Trout

Ingredients

⅓ lb Lake Superior Smoked Trout

½ Lemon juice (if not juicy, use the whole lemon)

2 tsp Minced chives*

3 tbsp Mayo

½ tbsp Dijon Mustard

Black pepper to taste

*leave a bit for decoration


Smoked Salmon with Black Pepper and Coriander

Ingredients

⅓ lb Smoked Salmon with Black Pepper and Coriander

2 tbsp Medium-minced red onion

2 tbsp Medium-minced parsley

¼ cup Sour Cream

Black pepper to taste

If you have some scallions around, slice a bit for decoration.

 

Spanish- Style Dry-Cured Chorizo

Ingredients

¼ cup or 3 Tblsp Pan fried thinly matchstick sliced chorizo*

¼ cup tbsp Mayo

2 tbsp Dijon Mustard

*Leave a little for decoration.

 

Directions:

Boiling the eggs-

Add the eggs in a single layer, cover with cold water, bring to a boil, then shut the heat off for 12 minutes, the eggs will be perfectly cooked. Add a splash of vinegar to stave off runaway egg whites if there is crackage.

Once timer goes off, place your eggs in a bowl with water and ice to stop the eggs from further cooking.
Peel your eggs once they are cold.

When slicing your eggs, keep a wet kitchen towel by you and clean your knife in between each egg.

 

Making the filling-

A lot of this will be left to preference. Do you liked your deviled eggs with a little bit more texture? Then don’t use a food processor to mix your ingredients. Use a spatula and mix back and forth until you can’t find big chunks of yolks in your mixture. Mix ‘til preferred smoothness.

If you’re using a food processor, combine the yolks, and the rest of your ingredients and process until the mixture is to your smooth preference. Scrape the bowl as necessary.

 

To pipe or not to pipe?

Depending on your mood or who you’re sharing the eggs with, you might just want to use two spoons to place the mixture in the white egg halves. If you wanna pipe, pipe away, baby! Make a sweet swirl and decorate your eggs with chives, scallions or fresh cracked pepper.

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Expanded Delivery & Catering Services

We at the island of food weirdos love any excuse to get together and eat good food. Creativity has its ways of blossoming relationships and inspiring co-workers to entice both themselves and customers. Late nights lead to planning other late nights. In this case, we kept it not-so-late, but we did combine a lot of our favorite things in one place.
We are excited to invite our fellow food lovers and Smokehaus friends to our “Delivery Debut & Catering Cotillion” (for the love of alliteration) at the Red Herring Lounge.
This is your opportunity (YES!) to come and sample some bites of our slow fast food. We can’t sample our whole *brand* new catering menu, but we can sample the cult-classics and party pleasers.
What can you expect?
A showcase of our talented, creative catering and delivery crew. They’re food lovers, musicians and entertainers. Our talented Seym0ur, Ned Netzel, will set the mood as you can delight yourself with small bites and participate in our raffle that includes tons of Smokehaus $wag. Our raffle has a small price ($1 per raffle tickets) and all of the funds that are raised will be donated to the Damiano Center located in Duluth.
What kind of $wag?
Anything from our classic Rick Allen Tees that are loved by Duluthians and transplants to free All Season Platters and sandwiches.

Here’s the low-down:
When? July 7th, 2016.
Where? 208 E 1st Street
Time? 7-9pm
Cost? Free. $1 Raffle tickets.

We can’t wait to share our love for food with you!

xoxo-
Team Smokehaus

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A New Bearing: Smokehaus Smoked Atlantic Salmon and True North

a piece of smoked Atlanitc salmon cut into slices on a wooden board

By Fiona O’Halloran-Johnson, NWSH Sustainability Chief and smoked Atlantic Salmon lover

Here at the Smokehaus we go through a lot of fish, specifically smoked Atlantic salmon. It goes on our sandwiches both at the deli and the restaurant, on catering platters, it’s shipped straight to your door, or goes home in your bag on your way out of Duluth.

For many years we have been committed to providing you with delicious smoked fish and smoked meats, while adhering to sustainable practices throughout the business – from composting to bike delivery. We have been working on creating programs to decrease our overall waste and impact here at home, but that’s not enough. We have a responsibility to know about our meat and fish, not just the process of how we make it so tasty, but where it comes from.

We are one of the largest buyers of Atlantic salmon in the United States. Yes, our humble little shop buys more Atlantic salmon than restaurants in New York, or huge resorts in California. With this, we have felt a responsibility to look for a sustainable source of salmon that could keep up with our high demands. Prior to the switch, we have been getting Atlantic salmon off the coast of Chile.  While there were many positive attributes to this salmon, simply the length of travel was enough for us to realize we needed a more sustainable source.

We began to look for an option closer to home, but we were not willing to compromise our commitment to sustainable aquatic farming. There is so much that can go wrong when farming fish, from assuring water is not permanently polluted, to making sure the fish are not carrying disease, such as sea lice, that can be transferred to the native populations of aquatic life. We also wanted product that was not full of chemicals, dyes and hormones. We had set our standards pretty high.

And then we found True North.

We are thrilled to announce that we are now selling  Smoked Atlantic Salmon made from True North Salmon Company, a family owned company based out of New Brunswick, Canada. This is exciting for us because we have been concerned about our environmental impact on aquatic life for some time now.   

True North is certified to the Best Aquaculture Practices and the British Retail Consortium Global Standard for Food Safety.

True North is the quintessential sustainable fish farm.

True North uses ocean pens, but rotates crops regularly and uses a fallowing system to ensure that the water and ocean floor rest in between crops. They also stock their salmon in pens at a rate of less than 2% percent of the volume of the pen, which means these salmon have plenty of room to swim around freely and develop healthy muscle tissues naturally.  Their fish also grow on a natural cycle, with no growth hormones, taking two years for the fish to make it to market.

True North is committed to finding fish food that is made sustainably. They use fish meal and oil that are byproducts of fish that is harvested for human consumption, maintaining equilibrium in the local aquatic life. True North has decreased its carbon footprint by using fuel-efficient trucks, and driving a little slower to reduce their carbon emissions when transporting their fish. With their commitment to preserving fresh water they also have a water recycling and filtration system at their freshwater hatcheries. They have also invested in shipping boxes that are made from 100% recycled material.

We are excited about our new Atlantic salmon provider, and we’re excited about taking another big step towards consuming smoked Atlantic  salmon responsibly so we can keep making all your delicious snacks for years to come.

For more information, please peruse:

True North Atlantic Salmon

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A Day in the Life of a Fish Smoker Part 2: The Rack

After the fish has been brined, Tyson rinses the excess salt and sugar off the salmon. Now comes the racking process: pretty simple except it is important to leave just enough room between the salmon pieces to prevent them sticking together during the smoking. This would be very simple if we didn’t have to stuff the smoker every time we smoke – so we try to squeeze every millimeter of space to accommodate as much fish as possible.

As the fish is racked, Tyson spices some and leaves others bare – our Traditional smoked salmon. The spices – Black Pepper and Coriander; Dill; and Cajun – are evenly sprinkled (or perhaps doused) over the salmon pieces. Once the salmon is sufficiently gussied up, the fish will chill in a constantly-circulating cooler. This creates a kippering affect, sealing in moisture and simultaneously fostering a thin bark around each slice.

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salmon rinsing

 

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salmon rack

salmon spice

 

salmon spicing trio
Atlantic Salmon, set to be smoked