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Northern Bagel Sandwich Kit

Some food bites transport you.

 

Creamy whipped scallion cream cheese, perfectly smoked, flakey Traditional Salmon and a golden (with a slight hint of sweetness) Lake Superior Bakehouse Bagel.

Can you remember the anticipation while waiting in line?

Can you remember the list of to-dos and must-sees while visiting the western tip of Lake Superior?

Do you remember avoiding making eye contact with the Seagulls (or lake birds)?

 

 

This May, we will help transport you to the unsalted sea. You can bring a friend along and share a Northern Bagel anywhere in the United States.
No luggage required. 

Coming Soon

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HausBao

Why Berkshire?
Berkshire Pork is a driving force around our Smokehaus team. The marble in the fat and its fat content renders a soft, chewy and luxurious Pork.
We believe in using the best-of-the-best in Heritage Berkshire Pork because of its moist texture, superb marbling and juicy meat.
Did you know that the when Berkshire Pork is certified by the Heritage Berkshire Program it’s referred to as Kurobuta? Kurobuta is like wagyu beef and/or jidori chicken.

It’s no secret that the biggest inspiration comes from a quality beginning. When we begin our creative process with Berkshire Pork, we are only enhancing it’s succulent flavor by pairing it with other well(local when possible) sourced ingredients.

The HausBao

With our first inspiration being Berkshire, Our second inspiration comes from traditional Chinese roots, the contemporary food culture of BaoHaus, and our adoration for the sweet, succulent & crunchy bao sandwich.That’s just the beginning & the inspiration. We then do what the island of food weirdos does best and we add a Smokehaus twist.

TherE are two ways to achieve this recipe to maximum delicious.
Please make note that all the quick-pickle veggies must be made the day before you wish to enjoy the Bao.

INGREDIENTS

For the Pork Belly
Buy a nice slab of Pork Belly from your local co-op, butcher, or local Asian Market.

1.25 lb -Pork Belly
Salt
Pepper
2 T -Rice Vinegar
4 T- Soy Sauce
2 T -Ginger, minced
4 cloves Garlic, minced
¼ Serrano Pepper, minced (optional)

For the Quick Pickled Veggies

1 Daikon, julienned
2 large Carrots, julienned
1 Cucumber, sliced thinly
4-5 small Red Radish, sliced thinly
1 small Red Onion, sliced thinly
3 C White Vinegar
3 C Water
1 C Sugar
1 T Salt

For the mayo

1.5 Serrano Chiles, minced  **2 whole peppers if you like it super spicy**
2 C Mayo

Accoutrements

Small bunch  cilantro, minced
2 T Marcona almonds,minced. (**lightly toasting them is optional)
1 Green onion, sliced at a bias.
Sriracha

The Bun

IMG_8567

1 bag of Buns: GWA PAO (Bánh Bao Kep) **find these at your local Coop or Asian Market.
Heat these up in the oven for a 1-2 mins, flipping these to have a hint of golden. You can use the previous 425F temperature.

 

HOW TO COOK THE PORK BELLY

salt_bao          sear_bao           deglaze_bao

Long Way

1. Season a nice sprinkle of salt and pepper on both sides of the belly –not too much. Wrap the Pork Belly in two layers of tin-foil and roast it slow for 275 F. Leave the wrapped-up Pork Belly in tin foil to rest until it reaches room temperature and it’s ready to be refrigerated.

2. Refrigerate overnight in its juices (in the tin foil).

3. Slice the cooled Pork Belly into 1/2 inch pieces.

4. In a bowl, whisk together the rice vinegar, soy sauce and the minced ginger, garlic and optional Serrano.

5. Heat up a saute pan, cast iron or wok with a little bit of high temperature oil (like peanut or Canola) on high heat and sear your sliced Pork Belly. Allow each side of the Pork Belly to brown and swirl in some oil as you’re adding more slices (don’t overlap slices).

6. Lower to medium-low heat and add the ginger, soy sauce & rice vinegar. Allow each slice to simmer in the sauce for 10 minutes.

**Quick way

(pre-heat oven to 425F)

1. Season a nice sprinkle of salt and pepper on both sides of the belly –not too much.

2. Brown your belly. Heat up your cast iron or oven safe saute pan to high temperature. Use high temperature oil (like peanut or canola) and wait until your pan begins to smoke to before you place the belly. Sear each side (edges, too) of the belly leaving each area beautifully brown.

3. Foil the top of your cast iron & bake the pork for 20 minutes on each side until it reaches temperature (150F). Let it rest for 10 mins and slice in ½ inch slices.

4. With your pan at medium heat,  add the soy sauce to coat the bottom of the pan & mix in the minced garlic and serrano pepper. Place the sliced pork belly in the pan without them overlapping. Add the rice wine vinegar to deglaze and caramelize the bellies. Make sure to equally flip these over.


PREPARING THE MAYO
Mix the minced Serrano with the mayo and refrigerate until you are ready to assemble the Baos.

QUICK PICKLE THE VEGGIES

1. Combine all of your prepared veggies in a stainless steel bowl (it’ll help them cool faster).

2. Bring your Vinegar, water, sugar and salt to a rapid boil. Boil for 2 mins.

3. Pour the boiling vinegar mix into the veggies and refrigerate overnight.
**For faster cooling veggies place the veggies in a larger bowl with water and place it in the freezer for a couple hours (don’t let them freeze).

 

Assembling the HausBao

IMG_8542

1. Smear mayo on the bun.
2. Place your Pork Belly.
3. Add your pickled veggies (enough to fill the rest of the bun).
4. Sprinkle the minced accoutrements on your Bao.
5. Add Sriracha for spice and flavor.

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Expanded Delivery & Catering Services

We at the island of food weirdos love any excuse to get together and eat good food. Creativity has its ways of blossoming relationships and inspiring co-workers to entice both themselves and customers. Late nights lead to planning other late nights. In this case, we kept it not-so-late, but we did combine a lot of our favorite things in one place.
We are excited to invite our fellow food lovers and Smokehaus friends to our “Delivery Debut & Catering Cotillion” (for the love of alliteration) at the Red Herring Lounge.
This is your opportunity (YES!) to come and sample some bites of our slow fast food. We can’t sample our whole *brand* new catering menu, but we can sample the cult-classics and party pleasers.
What can you expect?
A showcase of our talented, creative catering and delivery crew. They’re food lovers, musicians and entertainers. Our talented Seym0ur, Ned Netzel, will set the mood as you can delight yourself with small bites and participate in our raffle that includes tons of Smokehaus $wag. Our raffle has a small price ($1 per raffle tickets) and all of the funds that are raised will be donated to the Damiano Center located in Duluth.
What kind of $wag?
Anything from our classic Rick Allen Tees that are loved by Duluthians and transplants to free All Season Platters and sandwiches.

Here’s the low-down:
When? July 7th, 2016.
Where? 208 E 1st Street
Time? 7-9pm
Cost? Free. $1 Raffle tickets.

We can’t wait to share our love for food with you!

xoxo-
Team Smokehaus

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Great Moments in the Smokehaus Lexicon: The Story of The Gorilla

Every business has their unique jargon. The restaurant industry in general is fraught with code – a hold-over from expediting short orders coupled with the Tower of Babel-scale mix of languages that populate many American eateries, there are general terms we all seem to know: “86,” “all-day,” “to fly,” “slammed,” etc., but each place usually creates its own set of slang over time and the Smokehaus isn’t an exception. Today we shall reveal the story of one of our most mystifying sandwich titles: The Gorilla.

We didn’t always smoke meat. We started off sticking to fish – Eric had one smallish smoker off-site in a commercial kitchen and a license that allowed him to smoke and sell it but forbade him to distribute anything that had hooves, fur, or mammary glands (like fish versus swine, the FDA and USDA are also two different animals, and one has deeper pockets and some pretty outstanding long-term relationships with big ag that pretty much eliminates small-time processors like us from selling to anyone, anywhere except our own storefront, but that’s a story for another time). Eventually, we moved our operation to Dewitt Seitz, directly under our retail space. This enabled us to start smoking sausage, pastrami, ham, and pork loin. Eric would tinker around with backyard-smoker recipe favorites, adapting them to the more formal demands of our commercial Vortron units, and we the few employees at the time would reap the rewards. What a time to be alive and carnivorous!

Eventually, like so many crossroads in life, it came down to perfecting the simplest recipe: the ham.

The first perfect batch was glorious – rosy, glistening mounds of promise, made even more pristine by the charred unholy walls of the smoker. Like Aphrodite in the lap of Hephaestus, the natural beauty of the ham was elevated to irresistible by its company, and we sawed off pieces straight from the rack, surrounding the smoker and taking turns with the knife. There is nothing like meat from the smoker. Smoky, yes, and tender and salty and sweet – but there is a delicacy when it is newly made that wears off after it has been cooled and stored. Even more heavy-handed items like pastrami or andouille are touched with this grace note when the smoke clears and we open the big stainless door. Ham is perhaps most demonstrative of this phenomenon, and this first batch was a revelation to us all.

Eric’s best childhood friend Dan was in town, and was among the few to enjoy this singular experience. The two had grown up together in Iowa, Dan was currently living in New York City, and they still keep in touch. As the silence that fell over our greasy mouths began to dissipate with the mumblings and exclamations of pleasure, Dan began to tell us a tale.

“I had the craziest dream last night. I don’t know if it’s because I was sleeping in Eric’s basement where it’s extra dark, extra quiet and extra cold? Anyway, I dreamt like all night last night, but all I remember is this one part. I was in my parents’ house back in Iowa, it was at night, I was alone. There was a sliding glass door off the living room, and the deck was lit up. There was this enormous gorilla pounding on the door to get in, and it was terrifying. He pounded and pounded, and would pace back and forth in between poundings. I didn’t know what to do – the thing must have weighed a ton and there was just this thin layer of glass between us, but I couldn’t run away. It just kept taunting me, rattling the glass. It was one of those full-grown silverback types you see on PBS, with smart, shiny eyes and big yellow teeth.  But the thing is, the gorilla was wearing a jean jacket.”

Urban worldliness mixed with childhood fantasy? Wilderness anxiety? Brain flush? We didn’t know what Dan’s psyche was up to, but we did know that we thought it was hilarious. The image coupled with the meat high was enough to send us into cry-laughter for several minutes. It was a wonderful feeling. Eventually, when we calmed down, we started to talk sandwiches. We knew this basic but beautiful meat deserved the same on the menu, and settled for a simple ham, Swiss, lettuce, mustard, and mayo sandwich on rye. Name-wise, we half-heartedly tossed a few around. I particularly wanted it to be called the Bukowski, but we all knew that it really could only be The Gorilla.

Later, when we discovered that our most popular two sandwiches (The Cajun Finn and Cold Turkey) were significantly boosted by the addition of cilantro and Sriracha, we found a place to hang the Jean Jacket – a secret menu addition that delights many customers to this day, though few know the origin. In fact, you can add a Jean Jacket to nearly anything on the menu, though I still think the Gorilla is best au natural. So, the next time you order a Gorilla, or add a jean jacket, remember that it comes from a very honest ether – and you are having a taste of Smokehaus history.