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5 Things Volume 4

Volume 4

The backpack kids are back in town. School is back in session and with a new season comes its ups and downs.

  1. Our co-workers have less time for us! Some of our really hilarious and youthful souls are back in the world of academia. Study hard: Cedar, Asher, Keira, Jake, Cy, Cal, Ian, Kjell, Lucy and Thomas. On a very, very exciting note- Penti (our summer spunky basement daredevil) is studying abroad in India and we wish him all the luck and encouragement on his grand adventure overseas.

Pictured above is the Mr. Deli Manager TK — not going back to school — who’s been keeping his nose in books while researching more and more about fermentation but that’s for another 5 things.

 

2. We have been joined by a local jean-vest-wearing-rockstar Jacob. When he’s not slaying sandwiches, Jacob’s a multi-media working artist in Duluth. He makes short films, shoots video and plays in several bands in town. Welcome to the island of food weirdos!

Ok… So if you add the look, the knife and the t-shirt… You might get the wrong impression of him. He’s actually an incredible sweetheart. We just wanted him to be fierce for the internet. 

 

3. Earlier this summer our assistant manager JT (read: Coach) took a leap of faith and moved across the country to Montana. We were heartbroken to lose him as he brought in a stellar sense of humor to the workplace, but we knew that he had a different scenery calling his name. So since we’re in the middle of testing our new sandwich kit, we sent JT the first four person Cajun Finn Kit! Reports say it arrived safely and made for a sentimental meal with a piece of home. We miss you, JT!!!

This could be you. Stay tuned as we will announce the Cajun Finn Kit this fall!!

 

Barn dinner. Barn dinner. Barn dinner. Those two words have been on everyone’s mind for the last month here at the Smokehaus! So we are happy that tomorrow is finally the day that we will be sharing and making a wonderful experience with 50 guests and co-workers. Eric Goerdt sure knows how to throw a damn party!

4. Stephen and Mary made Mozzarella from scratch for our antipasto platters that we are serving at “Boot in the Barn” this Saturday at Hemlock Preserve. To make Mozzarella you have to bring up your curd mixture to 105 F. There was talk about double gloves, hot hands and other phrases that confirms that love and labor went into the making of the Mozzarella. 

 

5. Three large Porchettas will be smoked, roasted and fire licked as the main event for our “Boot in the Barn” dinner. This week Eric and TK rolled Berkshire pork loin and bellies together. Each Porchetta was massaged and slathered with white wine, lemon, rosemary, sage, garlic and olive oil and will be cooked until tender-perfection. Each Porchetta weighs about 20 lbs!!!! That’s a lot of mouth-watering Berkshire pork.

 

Excuse our raw image, processing isn’t always glamorous but the outcomes are worth the mess. 
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5 Things Volume 3

Volume 3

It’s the last official Friday of the summer! We’ve been honking right along, despite the competition (or welcome reprieve) of the State Fair, with catering, special events, and delivery.

  1. We cranked out 67 BEAUTIFUL raviolo for our Boot in the Barn Feast on September 9th. Eric’s special pasta recipe is stuffed with Bayfield sheep’s milk ricotta, Parmigiano Reggiano, Minnesota sweet corn, leeks, and love. 
  2. Stephen finished the Cedar Lounge menu – making this cozy Superior watering hole even more unique: it’s the only place in Superior we will be providing regular delivery!
  3. Northern Waters Restaurant has been offering a Burbot Po’ Boy sandwich – based on the New Orleans original but adapted for the Northwoods, it’s a must-try! 
  4. Ken Hammerlund, mystical vegetable genius (aka our tomato guy), appeared with his own blend hot sauce. We’ve been working on our own recipe, and his zesty, veggie-infused concoction is a great inspiration.
  5. Woody’s brand new baby boy has robbed him from our basement! Jeremy has been holding down the prep room nonetheless, even as the sandwich cooler has been on the fritz, employees have called in sick, and delivery has exploded! Thanks, Jerbaby Boi.
  6. BONUS: Boot in the Barn planning is revving up. We’ve selected a remarkable amount of crystal, travertine, bronze, and silver to make a Medici marvel. Ci vediamo li! 
    
    

 

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Boot in the Barn: A Celebration of the Harvest

Boot in the Barn: A Celebration of the Harvest

September 9th at 5pm 

 

School’s back, winter’s coming, and it’s almost time to tuck in. We are celebrating the bounty of late summer Italian-style with a lavish dinner in a spectacular location, and you’re invited.

Northern Waters Smokehaus is hosting another Barn Dinner in Esko at the beautiful Hemlock Preserve. A private estate that plays hosts to weddings and parties every season, Hemlock includes a large barn dining room, a lavish nook-laden lounge, and views of the Saint Louis Valley.

The $75 tickets grant entrance to the historic barn, where guests will be served cocktails, beer, wine, and spritzers and then receive a 5 course meal celebrating the harvest. The menu will include local seasonal ingredients and is inspired by Italian (specifically Tuscan) cuisine, which parallels Smokehaus food in all the right ways – it celebrates simple ingredients, isn’t afraid to party a little bit, and demands technique in every step.

The meal will include campari cocktails, beer, wine, and non-alcoholic drinks; a pasta course; fire-licked porchetta made with Berkshire pork loin and belly (a very special blend) and stuffed with sage, rosemary, and garlic; a salad course; dessert; hausmade limoncello; and coffee.

Music, as usual, will be provided – just bring yourself, relax, and celebrate the season.

This will be the last public dinner offered by Northern Waters Smokehaus for the year at Hemlock Preserve. You can order tickets online, email or call Mary or Flo at (218) 724-7307 ext 201

 

 

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Northern Comfort – A Barn Dinner with Northern Waters Smokehaus

On July 22, 2017, we welcome you to another Smokehaus/Hemlock Preserve collaboration at the barn in Esko.

We can’t help but reminisce.

It’s August 2015, a heady day amid a heady summer, and I am slogging through piles of prep in the Smokehouse. There are smokers, dishwashers, managers, prep people, and miscellaneous fishermen who need their fish custom-smoked endlessly pouring in and out of the long oblong space, slipping on the moist bricks of the kitchen floor and talking as loud as they can in order to be heard above the clamber of our industrial fans and Daft Punk. Fresh smoke is in the air from a recent truck (a large, rolling cart that has little shelves to load perforated racks for smoking) of smoked pork shoulder, which is cooling magnificently in the center of the room, a white-handled Dexter knife placed on the top rack beside a chunk that has been hacked off and savored. I’m “supervising” cornbread: Eric’s recipe, which includes lovely fresh corn off the cob and lovelier butter and cream, needs to be backed in batches and served while still warm to guests 45 miles and 2 hours away. We have heirloom tomatoes to delicately dismantle, Octo-Vin (fresh and unashamedly from the pages of the Momofuku cookbook) to make, herbs to pick, pasta salad to season, servers to wrangle, and the almighty “gather” list to attend to. I’ve got an empty stomach, a torn t-shirt and filthy apron, and it’s about time to load up.
On the way to Esko, just as we crest Thompson Hill, I get a frantic call from my partner in crime, April. She can’t account for the Octo-Vin – and neither can I, so I scramble to the back of my Volvo as my husband continues speeding towards our destination, and I’m digging through towels and warm (read:hot) cast iron skillets of cornbread and adorable menu cards that Flo magically whipped up and I touch a mystery Cambro, extract it from its nesting place – and voila! – our not-so-secret sauce. “Good news,” I tell April over the Volvo’s failing muffler, “I found the Octo-Vin.” “We need ice!” April laughs. We’re pretty used to these situations – we kind of live for them.
There’s a little cloud of dust as we turn down the dirt road toward Hemlock Preserve, obscuring the brambly ditch weeds and meandering path for a few minutes, but we make the turn toward Sue Watt’s estate and everything becomes clear. Two straight rows of pale pebbles guides our tire, a manicured strip of hyperactive green grass down the center. Our kitchen – a ten-by-ten foot tent that we use during farmers markets along with a propane-powered set of turkey fryers and a few folding tables smartly lined with Epicurean cutting boards – is pretty much ready for action and we pull up to unload. I leave the Volvo empty handed in order to get the lay of the land and walk toward the barn.
The barn – white, stately, adorned with Rhododendrons – I haven’t seen it for a few months, when it was closed off for the season. Now it is in full blossom. It is elegant and country, mismatched and perfectly appointed, it is the Henri Matisse of barns – it is natural but it is secretly, expertly organized. Every nook and cranny is a still life. The sunlight is somehow captured in the vaulted holiness of the barn’s wooden ceiling arches, and I get the feeling I am smelling hay from pre-war Minnesota. There is twinkling from the silverware and creaking from the floorboards. Ned has started to tune up his guitar and starts playing a Pavement song gently to himself. This is perfect. I think this to myself, but I’m saying it out loud, and everyone else is saying it too.
The food that follows has no choice – it is also perfect, as are the guests, the drinks, the wacky chauffeur, the soft ice cream, the distant lightening. This place is like that – inexplicably, effortlessly glorious. The day’s preparations, anxieties, arguments and oversights have vanished into the evening, drifting down the meadow into the St. Louis River Valley with the embers of our bonfire, soaked up and overturned by our guests and their laughter.
We invite you to join us once again to Hemlock Preserve. Dinner will be served – fried chicken and fixings – as well as drinks and dessert. We figure we all deserve a little Northern Comfort.

Hemlock Preserve barn with table by Sue Watt, dinner by Northern Waters Smokehaus, and menu cards by Flo.

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Top Five Boursin Recipe Ideas

boursin jars

Boursin is a versatile, flavorful, creamy addition to many meals. We started making Boursin at Northern Waters Smokehaus on a whim and it has now become one of our most popular cheese case items. Over the years, we’ve learned to concoct some simple dishes with our Boursin, adding an herbal, lemony lift to veggies and meats alike. Our Mother’s Day Gift Box is a favorite – the combination of smoked Sockeye salmon, crispy crackers, and fluffy cheese is an elegant, binge-worthy snack. Here are the top 5 Boursin recipe ideas (so far) for you. For more exact recipes, email creative [@] nwsmokehaus.com and we’ll do our best to get you cooking with Boursin to mathematical perfection!

Five time-tested, Smokehaus-approved recipe ideas for our Boursin:

#5: Boursin and Endive Bites

Belgian endive is almost always available at the grocery store, even here in the Great White North. These delicate little torpedoes of green are crisp, sweet, and very slightly bitter – a perfect foil for creamy, citric, floral Boursin. Simply trim the endive ends and gently separate the leaves. You will find a delicate little shovel – a great conduit for many mediums, and excellent for a dollop of Boursin. Use a teaspoon to smear the Boursin or get fancy and pipe it (with a pastry bag or clipped plastic one – up to you). We garnish ours with jolly little Sweetie Drops, or pickled Peruvian peppers, but feel free to use your own favorite garnish – paprika, parsley, anything pickled – or go au naturale and let the bite speak for itself.

#4: Steak and Boursin

What can we say? Compound butter + grilled beef = heaven on earth. Useful on any cut, but especially the fatty, interesting ones, like New York strip, Boursin will be the equivalent of a Valentino gown on Sophia Loren: it will cling to it in all the right places. Salt and pepper your steak, let it get to room temperature, cook it over or under hot flame for your desired temperature, let it rest for 5 minutes, dollop with a Tablespoon of Boursin, and let rest for at least another 5 minutes. Devour, with or without starch to sop up the resulting incredible juices.

#3 Chicken and Boursin Surprise

The real surprise here is that this doesn’t exist at every fast-casual American eatery on the planet. This is a simple yet luxurious meal that is quick to construct, satisfying, and actually makes great leftovers for sandwiches. Pound chicken breasts to a ½ inch thickness, spread an even layer of Boursin approximately ¼ inch thick,  and add a layer of cured muscle meat, like prosciutto, jamon serrano, or copa (if you live near the Smokehaus deli or are a member of our Smokehaus of the Month Club, we recommend asking for our Speck or Lonzino). Roll the cutlets into wheels, secure with toothpicks, sprinkle with salt and pepper, dredge in flour, and fry in good oil until golden and cooked through (165 degrees). Great with buttered, Parmiganno’d pasta, roasted asparagus, or sliced after cooling and served on a leafy green salad.

#2 Boursin Toast

Inspired by a local business that boldly decided to exclusively offer coffee and toast (we miss you, JPH!), we salute the simplicity of a crusty, magnificent slab of Duluth sourdough stuffed into the nearest (and most accommodating) toaster, grilled to pedal-to-the-metal blackish-brownish, and smeared with enough Boursin that it qualifies as a “barge.” Extra points for those who first slather their toast with butter, but enough Boursin will certainly do the trick. Top with sun-ripened tomatoes, crumbled bacon or pancetta, a raisin smiley face (probably gross, but pretty kitschy, no?), or nothing at all.

#1 Boursin and Smoked Turkey Sandwiches

At the risk of redundancy, we here at the Smokehaus are really into sandwiches. We live sandwiches from the moment we flick on our meat case lights and start cutting cucumbers in the morning to the end of the day when Jerry ushers out the last stray customer with a flourish of his vest and stamp on their sandwich card. We fully realize that many would place a steak at #1 on this list, especially considering that a lowly turkey sandwich had secured the top ranking. But we are not many. We are sandwich people. Our original intent for Boursin was on a turkey sandwich, but we quickly realized the delicious nature of said sandwich would backfire and we would have to hire a whole separate person in the summers to exclusively make Boursin to keep up with demand. So here is the catalyst for the hundreds of cute little medicine jars of Boursin we sell, revealed at last, The Green Meanie: buy or make some naan (we use Stonefire, and it’s really good), and warm it in the oven. Slather liberally with Boursin. Aim the point of your naan to the left to orient the sandwich. In a vertical line down the center, place an even row of cucumber slices, basil leaves, pickled jalapenos, and as much smoked turkey as you like (but don’t get crazy, you need to roll this up). Starting at the wide end, roll the sandwich, tucking stray ingredients as you go. Slice in half and savor a Smokehaus secret.

 

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Scotch Eggs with Maple Breakfast Sausage

Come visit us at our Canal Park Storefront in Duluth, MN to purchase the Maple Breakfast Sausage.

This recipe uses one whole bag of Maple Breakfast Sausage (weight varies per each bag but you will use about 8-10 sausages).

Ingredients

6 eggs

1 lb of Smokehaus Maple Breakfast Sausage

1 tsp cayenne pepper (optional)*

*You can substitute cayenne for 1 tbsp of fine diced spicy fresh pepper of your choice.

4 green onions, fine minced

2 cups high-temperature oil, such as peanut or rapeseed, if frying

2 eggs, whisked

½ cupflour

½ cup Panko bread crumbs

½ cup water


Utensils

4 bowls
Paper towels

Plastic wrap

Cutting board

Thermometer for oil temp

Large frying pan/cast iron skillet / or a baking sheet

DIRECTIONS
If you’re a visual learner: we recommend the following video for additional information and a visual guide on how-to. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hkPPn5ycsnc

Boil 6 eggs for 6 minutes (runny yolk)6 ½ minutes (for partially runny yolk), or 7 minutes (not so runny). Cool down those eggs to stop them cooking  by placing them inlace iced water for 5 minutes.. Gently peel your eggs (the less you cook them, the trickier it will be to peel them) and dry them with a paper towel.

Take sausage out of their casings and add the green onions and cayenne pepper. Lightly mix until just combined and raw sausage is malleable (beware of over-mixing, this will lead to tough sausage!). 

Get the oil ready for frying, have it reach a 350F temperature.

Pre-heat your oven  to 400 F**

if you’d rather bake the eggs. to 400 F**

Get your stations ready:

Plastic wrap your cutting board and tape one side of the plastic to the bottom of the cutting board (this will help keep it in place while you spread out the raw sausage).

Place remaining ingredients in separate bowls.

Make sure you dry your eggs before placing them on the flat raw sausage.

Scoop out a 2 inch ball of sausage, spread with wet fingers and then use the non-taped side of the saran wrap to finish spreading out the mixture. You’ll need enough of a diameter to cover the egg evenly.

Place your dry egg in the middle of the mixture, wet your fingers and slowly join all edges of the sausage to close up any gaps.

Coat the egg in flour then the whisked eggs and finally in panko bread crumbs.

Slowly place your egg in the fryer. Fry for 5 minutes. If you boiled the eggs the night before allow for an extra minute of boiling.

Allow the eggs to cool down and then slice, serve and enjoy!

BAKING

** For baking, place all coated eggs in a cookie sheet and bake for 30 minutes until golden.

Allow the eggs to cool down and then slice, serve and enjoy!

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Eggs Three-Way (or this is not a pipe)

Each of the following recipes are good for 6 eggs, or a dozen deviled eggs.

 

Smoked Lake Superior Lake Trout

Ingredients

⅓ lb Lake Superior Smoked Trout

½ Lemon juice (if not juicy, use the whole lemon)

2 tsp Minced chives*

3 tbsp Mayo

½ tbsp Dijon Mustard

Black pepper to taste

*leave a bit for decoration


Smoked Salmon with Black Pepper and Coriander

Ingredients

⅓ lb Smoked Salmon with Black Pepper and Coriander

2 tbsp Medium-minced red onion

2 tbsp Medium-minced parsley

¼ cup Sour Cream

Black pepper to taste

If you have some scallions around, slice a bit for decoration.

 

Spanish- Style Dry-Cured Chorizo

Ingredients

¼ cup or 3 Tblsp Pan fried thinly matchstick sliced chorizo*

¼ cup tbsp Mayo

2 tbsp Dijon Mustard

*Leave a little for decoration.

 

Directions:

Boiling the eggs-

Add the eggs in a single layer, cover with cold water, bring to a boil, then shut the heat off for 12 minutes, the eggs will be perfectly cooked. Add a splash of vinegar to stave off runaway egg whites if there is crackage.

Once timer goes off, place your eggs in a bowl with water and ice to stop the eggs from further cooking.
Peel your eggs once they are cold.

When slicing your eggs, keep a wet kitchen towel by you and clean your knife in between each egg.

 

Making the filling-

A lot of this will be left to preference. Do you liked your deviled eggs with a little bit more texture? Then don’t use a food processor to mix your ingredients. Use a spatula and mix back and forth until you can’t find big chunks of yolks in your mixture. Mix ‘til preferred smoothness.

If you’re using a food processor, combine the yolks, and the rest of your ingredients and process until the mixture is to your smooth preference. Scrape the bowl as necessary.

 

To pipe or not to pipe?

Depending on your mood or who you’re sharing the eggs with, you might just want to use two spoons to place the mixture in the white egg halves. If you wanna pipe, pipe away, baby! Make a sweet swirl and decorate your eggs with chives, scallions or fresh cracked pepper.

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Smokehaus Recipe: Carne Adobada

We have been making carne adobada since the early days of Northern Waters Smokehaus: Eric “discovered” this spicy, satiating dish while visiting his wife’s family in New Mexico. The New Mexican chile, or Hatch Chile, is integral to the recipe – feel free to simplify any or all of the other ingredients, but be firm on this one.

This recipe is a large one, but you can cut it in half if you want to. However, be warned – you will want leftovers, as adobada is great with eggs, in tamales, in soups, as enchilada filling, etcetera. This recipe also requires at least 24 hours (ours takes 3 days), and is especially well worth the time if you make the full amount.

hatch chili cut

Carne Adobada

Ingredients:

10 lbs fat-marbled pork (we use Berkshire pork hams or cheeks, but collar-butts and shoulders work fine)

1/2 lb dried Hatch or New Mexican Chilies, available online, or if you’re lucky, at a nearby grocery store

7 (or so) cloves of garlic

2 Tbsp of chicken base, or 1 cup chicken stock (in which case  lessen the water quantity accordingly)

1 Tbsp brown sugar

2 1/2 tsp cumin

2 tsp salt

1 tsp cinnamon

1 tsp dried oregano

Healthy squirt of Sriracha or the like

1 quart of water (if using chicken stock instead of base, lessen the water quantity by 1 cup)

Directions:

ham chunksOn a large cutting board, cut the pork into 1 1/2 – 2 inch cubes. Don’t worry too much about trimming away fat: most of it will be dissolved and enveloped into the sauce as it cooks. Throw the cubes in a large roaster/cast iron/enamel-coated Dutch oven. Use a sharp knife, and enjoy the zen that comes from spending so much time breaking up a large piece of meat. 

adobada cuiseIn a large food processor or blender, pulse the garlic. Cut the woody stems off of the chilies and add to the food processor, seeds and all. Fee free to wear kitchen gloves – the chilies get rather tingly, especially in the eye region. A half pound of chilies should nearly fill a 14 cup processor. If you are using a smaller model, simply split the recipe and do a double batch.

When you have piled in all the trimmed chilies, add the chicken base or stock, sugar, cumin, salt, cinnamon, oregano, and Sriracha. Pulse a few times, then slowly begin to add the water through the feed tube. If you add it too fast, you may have a mini-chile explosion on your hands (and on your kitchen), so take your time, and don’t let the mixture level exceed the lid of the processor. When all the water has been added, let the mixture blend until it is slightly thick and relatively smooth, about 5 more minutes.

adobada finished sauceTaste the mixture, and specifically check for salt. It will be quite spicy, but this attribute will mellow over time, so don’t fret if it knocks your tastebuds back into your palette.

Dump the sauce over your meat cubes, and mix well. Cover the mixture and let marinate, refrigerated, for at least 24 hours, but up to 3 days.

cooking adobadaPreheat your oven to 350ºF. Place the covered mixture in the oven and let roast for 45 minutes. Reduce the heat to 300ºF and let roast for at least 3 more hours (but preferably 4), stirring once in awhile. Uncover and let roast until browned and tender – approximately 30 minutes more. When it’s cool enough to taste, check for salt.

Serve with tortillas and not much else – a touch of yogurt or sour cream and a lightly-dressed pile of bitter greens on the side works out well, but through years of due diligence, we find adobada is best in its simplified form.

 

adobada close up

eating adobada

all done adobada

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Smokehaus Recipe: Potatoes Au Gratin with Chorizo

Perfect for Easter (or any old time of the year), we spun a classic recipe, potatoes au gratin, with a Smokehaus twist: our own dry-cured chorizo. The subtle smokiness of the chorizo offsets but does not overpower the earthiness of the potatoes, and the flowery-buttery nature of Gruyere binds the casserole into a creamy, harmonious dish that is all at once bright, silky, and memorable. Oh – and incredibly rich. Speaking of Gruyere, we used a recent addition to our cheese case from Wisconsin: Roth Kase’s Grand Cru.

potatoesaugratinchorizo

Gratin Potatoes with Crispy Chorizo

Ingredients:

2-3 cloves garlic

1 tsp (or so) butter

3 pounds Yukon Gold potatoes

3 cups heavy cream, or a milk/cream mixture if you’re squeamish

1 tsp (or so) olive oil

1 link dry-cured chorizo

2-3 medium shallots

1/2 lb Gruyere

Scant teaspoon sea/kosher salt

Black pepper

1-2 bay leaves

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 350F.

Cut each clove of garlic in half and rub the raw ends evenly over a large casserole (or Gratin if you’re fancy) dish. Reserve the garlic for later. Next, butter the dish and set aside. I also like to shred the Gruyere about now, so I don’t have to worry about it later.

grated gruyere

Peel and slice the potatoes, making sure they are uniform. We cut ours in approximately 1/8 inch rounds, and this really did the trick. In a large, heavy saucepan, combine cream, salt, pepper, bay leaves, and squished-up garlic from the above – then add the potatoes and stir the concoction as best you can. Bring this up to a medium simmer, and once at this temperature, cook for 7-10 minutes or until the “sauce” slightly thickens and the potatoes become slightly flexible (but not soft). 

potatoesgarlic

sauceandpotatoes

While this is happening, skin the chorizo, then dice it into small chunks. Heat the olive oil in a medium pan on medium-high and saute the chorizo until it is crispy, 5-10 minutes. The goal is a crispy coating around a softer interior. When this is achieved, fish the chunks out with a slotted spoon but keep the oil in the skillet. Slice the shallots into rings and add them to the chorizo oil. Sauté for a few minutes, until soft but not crispy. Once again, remove the goodies with a slotted spoon. I suggest putting them in a white ramekin – the better to marvel over their jewel-toned transformation – but any old plate/dish/bowl will do. 

chorizoskinned

If you have completed the chorizo/shallot work, I bet your potatoes are ready at this point, I like to taste the cream sauce for salt. It should be flavorful but not quite salty enough; remember – the chorizo and Gruyere will amp this up.  Remove the pot from heat, and get ready to layer your casserole.  Round up all the ingredients and coral them around the buttered, garlic-ed casserole dish. Start with the potatoes; gently lay them (along with any tag-along sauce) evenly along the bottom of the dish. Next, sprinkle the shallots, then half the chorizo, then half the Gruyere. Next, spread the rest of the potatoes (gingerly) on top, then the rest of the chorizo. Remove the bay and any large hunks of garlic from the cream sauce, and then pour over the casserole. Coat with the remaining Gruyere, and bake, uncovered, in a preheated oven for 45 minutes to an hour.

shallottoss

potatoesaugratinprep

We are now at the most unpleasant stage in this recipe: you must let it rest for at least 15 minutes after you take it out of the oven. During this process, the chorizo oil will reabsorb into the potatoes and the whole shebang will solidify, enabling a perfect slice. I recommend leaving the kitchen at this point to make the process a little less excruciating. 

augrainplate

augratinmoneyshot

Serve on its own, with steamed vegetables, or … BERKSHIRE SMOKED HAM!

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Smokehaus Recipe: Smoked Whitefish and Blue Cheese Pizza

I don’t know what took us so long to put our smoked Lake Superior whitefish on pizza – we certainly have tried every other Smokehaus goody this way. The whitefish is a perfect match for the blue cheese, as they are both somehow subtle and pungent at the same time, and neither seems to battle the other for a primary flavor position. The egg, while admittedly a little too far on-trend, is a beautiful garnish and adds a neutral flavor and a glamorous texture to the pizza. And let’s face it – there’s never too many eggs, especially in Smokehaus-land. We’ve adapted this recipe from the Cashel Blue website.

smoked whitefish and cheese

Cashel Blue Cheese and Smoked Lake Superior Whitefish Pizza

Ingredients:

1 8-10’’ pizza dough

Olive oil for drizzling

1/3 cup fresh spinach

1/3 cup smoked whitefish, de-boned, skinned, and flaked

2 oz Cashel blue, crumbled

1 large egg

Salt and pepper

Pecorino Romano for garnish

plated smoked whitefish pizza

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 425F.

Roll out your pizza dough and set it to rest for 15 minutes or so. If you have a pizza stone, be sure to preheat it. We just use an inverted baking sheet sprinkled with cornmeal, on which we also built the pizza. If using the pizza stone, build your pizza on a cornmeal-sprinkled peel.

Drizzle the dough with a little olive oil. Sprinkle with the spinach leaves, then the whitefish, and finally the Cashel blue. Create a small well in the center of these ingredients and crack your egg into it. Season the egg and the pizza with salt and pepper.

smoked whitefish pizza prep

smoked whitefish pizza prep

oven ready pizza

Place pizza in the oven and bake for 15-20 minutes. Garnish with shavings of Pecorino Romano. By the time you’re done shaving the cheese onto the pizza, it should be set and cool enough to cut.  Slice, eat, and rejoice.

rough cut pizza

smoked whitefish pizza beauty