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5 things volume 2

Volume 2

It’s Friday, and the weekend is just gearing up. Our busy shop season is nearing the end. There is sure to be a bustling shop this weekend and all the shenanigans that go with it, but here’s 5 things that happened this past week, at #thesmokehaus:

  1. As we have probably all forgotten already, Monday was the Solar Eclipse. The country seemed to be a buzz with the impending total eclipse, but NOT HERE IN DULUTH! NOPE! Go figure, a cloudy day here and we were stuck inside making sandwiches, processing meat, prepping food, and packing box after box of bacon. They tell me I will learn to love this “cool” weather in Duluth. They also tell me these 70 boxes that went out this week ain’t nothin’ compared to the holiday mail order season. Eeek! :/

  1. Taylor and Eric make a giant Porketta. We’re talking almost 20 pounds of butterflied pork loin and pork belly smothered in herbs and rolled to perfection. Several hours in the smoker will have that belly caramelized just right. Have you ever seen such beauty? And look at that Porketta! 🙂 This Tuscan-style porketta will be the focal point up our upcoming and final Barn Dinner of the season. We love putting on these events. We get to showcase our skills outside of the Smokehaus, and be creative and innovative. We get to bring people together over food (what we do best).

  1. Jerry made some bread this week (as he does every week). By the numbers: 1 guy, 80 loaves of bread, 1 tiny oven! Impressive, no? Jerry’s evil plan is to be a full time baker for the shop. YAASSSS! Right now he bakes all of this in a 2x2x2 Blodgett oven, a true testament to his commitment and love of bread-making.

  1. Can we talk for a minute about how we all hate packing peanuts? They are the worst! Always sticking themselves to your clothes and hands. We’re practically swimming in them here. But sadly they are a necessary component for shipping. 🙁 These 20 cubic foot bags are just ridiculous. With only 1 very over-used elevator at the DeWitt-Seitz Building, our employees hoisted these prodigious packs of peanuts up 3 flights of public stairs and public stares! A hilarious sight to see. Now they loom and tower over our ever enclosing office space.

  1. And unto us, a Smokehaus baby was born. Well, not exactly to us, but to our dear employee, Woody! We waited with anticipation all last week and as the silly due date came and went. Woody finally took his leave and we all blankly looked at each other wondering how we would know when it finally came. And finally this week, we get to say, “Congrats to the happy couple!”
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Boot in the Barn: A Celebration of the Harvest

Boot in the Barn: A Celebration of the Harvest

September 9th at 5pm 

 

School’s back, winter’s coming, and it’s almost time to tuck in. We are celebrating the bounty of late summer Italian-style with a lavish dinner in a spectacular location, and you’re invited.

Northern Waters Smokehaus is hosting another Barn Dinner in Esko at the beautiful Hemlock Preserve. A private estate that plays hosts to weddings and parties every season, Hemlock includes a large barn dining room, a lavish nook-laden lounge, and views of the Saint Louis Valley.

The $75 tickets grant entrance to the historic barn, where guests will be served cocktails, beer, wine, and spritzers and then receive a 5 course meal celebrating the harvest. The menu will include local seasonal ingredients and is inspired by Italian (specifically Tuscan) cuisine, which parallels Smokehaus food in all the right ways – it celebrates simple ingredients, isn’t afraid to party a little bit, and demands technique in every step.

The meal will include campari cocktails, beer, wine, and non-alcoholic drinks; a pasta course; fire-licked porchetta made with Berkshire pork loin and belly (a very special blend) and stuffed with sage, rosemary, and garlic; a salad course; dessert; hausmade limoncello; and coffee.

Music, as usual, will be provided – just bring yourself, relax, and celebrate the season.

This will be the last public dinner offered by Northern Waters Smokehaus for the year at Hemlock Preserve. You can order tickets online, email or call Mary or Flo at (218) 724-7307 ext 201

 

 

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Special Delivery – Coming to a Brewery Near You

smokehaus apparel bmx jersey 2

Northern Waters Smokehaus is teaming up with local breweries and bars to offer their one-of-a-kind sandwiches and catering  delivery to foodless businesses throughout the Twin Ports.

 

Starting with the 250-seat Hoops Brewery in Canal Park, the Smokehaus delivery mobile and fleet of bikes will deliver Cajun Finns, Pastrami Mommys, and Sitka Sushis all over town to feed hungry bar patrons some classic Duluth cuisine. The small deli and sandwich shop can get pretty congested, so customers hoping to avoid lines and the hustle and bustle of “the shop” can simply hop on their phones, scroll through the full menu online, and be eating a Cold Turkey with extra Crayo and a Jean Jacket (that’s cilantro and Sriracha, FYI) in 45 minutes via delivery.

 

Smokehaus food, painstakingly developed in the basement of the Dewitt Seitz Building for nearly 20 years, is ideal for beer sipping. Rich, slightly smoky, touched with salt, and eminently snackable, Smoked Salmon with Black Pepper and Coriander, Berkshire Pork Loin, Bison Buddies, and Curried Leg of Lamb can all stand up to a generous IPA – both beer and the Smokehaus’s recipes have a rich (mostly) European legacy. With such a delightful crop of talented brewmeisters in the Twin Ports and a delivery department full of energetic Smokehausers, it seems a supreme match for the food-brew-curious and longstanding culinary intelligentsia alike. Smokehaus delivery has been bringing the goods to Duluthians since 2015.

 

First offered through brand-spanking-new Hoops Brewing but soon to hit the bar at The Cedar Lounge and others to be announced.

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5 things that happened this week

Volume 1

Hello folks – there are so many things that happen at #thesmokehaus each week, it’s high time we start sharing a little more of the day to day from our island of food weirdos. Come along for the ride and catch up with 5 things that happened every week. We’ll share on Fridays. It’s not guaranteed to be a revelation or an earth-shattering event, but more of the laughter, food and quirkiness that keeps us coming together every week.

Here’s 5 things that happened at #thesmokehaus this week:

  1. Finished a little bacon project – that’s 120# sliced and packaged for a major order going out next week! People came together to get it done. It’s nice when we come together over bacon.

  1. Made “The Big Meg” on Thursday for lunch. Another sandwich on our “hidden menu” that has existed behind the scenes over the years. This one exists from the mind of a former great, as far as Smokehausers go. Russian dressing, lettuce, tomato, corned beef, red onion, cheddar, chopped pickles – toasted, baby!

  1. Speaking of babies, a baby was not born – Woody and wife have been expecting a baby any day now for the past week. We all come to work each day in hopes the little Smokehaus baby has come. Nope! A big fat, NOPE! Hang in there Kiah!

  1. Some folks go to Hoops – We deliver sandwiches to #HoopsBrewing, and wanted to catch up with our friends over there. It’s nice to tell the people that matter to you that you like them, are here for them, and want to feed them.

  1. Someone calls for mail order smoked eel – Uh, we don’t have smoked eel. FYI, if you thought we had smoked eel, we do not carry smoked eel.

Xoxo

Team Smokehaus

 

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How to Survive a Summer Line at Northern Waters Smokehaus

By Ned Netzel, Frontline Force, Musician, Sandwich Inventor

Dig, if you will, a picture of yourself entering Dewitt-Seitz Marketplace for the first time. It is a sunny, hot summer day, and you have just spent the last fifteen minutes searching for a parking spot or “bridged.” Your GPS has sent you on what seems like a wild goose- *ahem* salmon-chase, but finally you arrive at our shop—perhaps you first heard of us while watching our segment on Diners, Drive-Ins & Dives (filmed during our more idle days)—and after entering through the modestly-labelled “exit” door (appropriate only while wearing a raspberry beret) are asked to head to the back of what appears to be a line all the way through the building. Trust me: Those of us making sandwiches behind the counter are just as terrified as you. And those of us behind the deli cases feel for you. Now that we’ve acknowledged the mutual trepidation, I would like to lay out a (fingers crossed) concise guide to improving your experience, and that of your fellow patrons, at our establishment.

The “Flow” of our shop

This section is not about our talented designer, “Flo;” it is about the best way to navigate our tiny shop. A somewhat superficially confusing interior design element of our shop is that the checkout register is directly next to the exit door. Allow me to explain why this works best for everyone in three short points: First, it allows us to direct our line down through the building in such a manner that it neither clogs the hallway, nor blocks the entrance to our amazing neighbors, Lake Avenue Café . Secondly, it allows us to divide our tiny (even at two-times the size it was just 3 years ago) shop into an initial grocery/deliberation section, an ordering/payment section, and a final waiting/dining section. If this path is followed, the line will move steadily and your likeliness of feeling stuck in line will decrease greatly. Order grocery items, ask questions, and contemplate your sandwich order before the register; place sandwich orders at the register; prepare to be amazed after the register. My awesome (see: helpful, hilarious) coworkers and I are always there to help with the process, but you, dear reader, shall no longer be dependent on them.
Pro-tip: If you know exactly what you want, try ordering from our pickup/delivery department. You can even order online!

 

Interacting with Our Staff

Everyone in our shop is either human or service animal, so miscommunication is inevitable, but our staff is trained to do everything in our power to provide you with excellent service. Here are a few things you should feel free to ask of us, if we haven’t already offered them:

An Italiensk sandwich from Northern Waters Smokehaus
• Menus. 99%* of the time we have them available for our deli & catering department. You can take them with you or leave them once you’re finished. If you have your smartphone or tablet with you, all of the menus are available on our website. *This is one of  85% of all statistics made up on-the-spot for the purposes of this article.

• Samples. In an ideal world, we have curated samples for you already. In reality, sometimes the line and the long hours have us focused on figuring out what you want and getting it to you in a timely manner. This is your invitation to ask for samples. You have graced our shop with your patronage (or, in other words, waited in a long line to get there), so we would like you to leave with zero surprises about whether you’re getting what you want. With a few exceptions –  mostly frozen goods –  our products are available for sampling. All we ask is that you are respectful of your fellow customers. More on this in the next section, but as always, we are available to help guide the procession.
• Advice. Listen, our shop may be very small, but it can be overwhelming. The staff at NWS will never take for granted that you share our detailed knowledge of our products (shout out to the repeat customers and regulars who do, but there’s no expectation). The sandwich board alone merits hours of analysis (and aesthetic appreciation, shout out again to the phenomenal Flo). Ask us about our favorite sandwiches/deli items, customer favorites, pro-tips, and pairing recommendations. My coworkers and I are not robots, but due to the nature of the work, we often find ourselves repeating actions and phrases throughout the day. When engaged in a friendly manner, we at NWS are among the most thoughtful, funny, and helpful customer service representatives you’ll ever meet, and we love the food we prepare. It bears repeating that we feel for those of you who wait in long lines to experience our amazing products.

Interacting with your fellow customers

Please allow me to editorialize for a minute:
So many of us walk through the world in fear of those around us, or plagued by our own anxieties and problems. Have you ever found yourself feeling lost or alone in a sea of people? Humans are social creatures, yet so much that goes on in the world can isolate us, alienate us, or upset our carefully crafted and protected comfort zones. This isn’t wrong, by any means, but it is sad. Human existence is a strange and beautiful thing, and each person has a unique perspective on the world, yet it can be very easy to allow our joy and wonderment at our environment to become anger and annoyance.
With that said, the best advice I can offer you for surviving the long summer lines at NWS is to engage your fellow customers. Perhaps the person in front of you is ordering a month’s worth of deli items and you only want to order a few sandwiches: ask them if it’s alright to pass them and order. Our staff is used to facilitating these interactions, but we are not always able to. Perhaps you are new to our establishment and the person in front of you is a veteran Smokehauser: ask them if they have any recommendations. Take a look at our Trip Advisor reviews to find that we have passionate and knowledgeable customers. If I know anything about humans, it is that we love to talk about the things we like (guilty as charged: ask me about my favorite music sometime—probably not in the NWS line, although I have occasionally jotted down music recommendations for customers when I thought they would be valued. Maybe I’ll write a future blog post about music culture at NWS. I’ll have to check with my superiors first).
Share your light with your fellow customers, and be a mirror to reflect theirs. We’re all in this together.

Miscellaneous tips

*Have a locally crafted beer with your meal. Our shop can’t sell alcohol, but our neighbors at  Lake Avenue Café have a wonderful bar (a staff favorite post-shift haunt) and a liquor license that extends to the front deck and the tables in the hallway. Get your sandwich wrapped to-go or in a basket (which we trust you will return to us), grab a drink from Lake Avenue Café, and enjoy an exquisite meal in the sunshine of our shared patio.
• Feel as if you have waited long enough in line? Get something from our grab’n’go case and skip the wait for your sandwich, or have the deli staff make you a fish basket, which is typically ready by the time you get to the register. And of course, if lines aren’t your thing, here’s another reminder that you can place delivery and pickup orders online.
• Take it all in. Since we expanded our shop in 2014, we have put a ton of work into making NWS an aesthetically pleasing experience, from the smell and taste of smoked meats, fish and charcuterie, to the visual splendor of the hand-designed sandwich menu, to the serve-yourself nature of a number of our available grocery items, even to the music playing to keep our staff and guests dancing and smiling through the workday.
• Our pickup department has their own door, located in the alleyway between  our building and Duluth Pack. Our phone number is painted on the door next to it, and all you have to do to skip our voice menu and reach the pickup department is press 1. Unfortunately, due to the heavy volume of customers in our shop, if you want to order additional items once you arrive, you’ll have to wait in line. If you find yourself in this position, please refer to our wonderful How to Survive a Summer Line at Northern Waters Smokehaus guide.

If you have any further questions about the best way to experience our shop, I’m not surprised. I have worked at NWS for a few years, and I still learn things about our shop and sandwiches every shift. Just know that we’re happy you’re here for us, and we’ll do our best to be there for you.



P.S. If you noticed the Prince allusions at the beginning of this guide, I love you and you are part of what is right with this world. Try the Purple Range sandwich: A quarter pound of pastrami, cabbage, pepperoncini and red onion on a Crayo-spackled hero roll.

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Northern Comfort – A Barn Dinner with Northern Waters Smokehaus

On July 22, 2017, we welcome you to another Smokehaus/Hemlock Preserve collaboration at the barn in Esko.

We can’t help but reminisce.

It’s August 2015, a heady day amid a heady summer, and I am slogging through piles of prep in the Smokehouse. There are smokers, dishwashers, managers, prep people, and miscellaneous fishermen who need their fish custom-smoked endlessly pouring in and out of the long oblong space, slipping on the moist bricks of the kitchen floor and talking as loud as they can in order to be heard above the clamber of our industrial fans and Daft Punk. Fresh smoke is in the air from a recent truck (a large, rolling cart that has little shelves to load perforated racks for smoking) of smoked pork shoulder, which is cooling magnificently in the center of the room, a white-handled Dexter knife placed on the top rack beside a chunk that has been hacked off and savored. I’m “supervising” cornbread: Eric’s recipe, which includes lovely fresh corn off the cob and lovelier butter and cream, needs to be backed in batches and served while still warm to guests 45 miles and 2 hours away. We have heirloom tomatoes to delicately dismantle, Octo-Vin (fresh and unashamedly from the pages of the Momofuku cookbook) to make, herbs to pick, pasta salad to season, servers to wrangle, and the almighty “gather” list to attend to. I’ve got an empty stomach, a torn t-shirt and filthy apron, and it’s about time to load up.
On the way to Esko, just as we crest Thompson Hill, I get a frantic call from my partner in crime, April. She can’t account for the Octo-Vin – and neither can I, so I scramble to the back of my Volvo as my husband continues speeding towards our destination, and I’m digging through towels and warm (read:hot) cast iron skillets of cornbread and adorable menu cards that Flo magically whipped up and I touch a mystery Cambro, extract it from its nesting place – and voila! – our not-so-secret sauce. “Good news,” I tell April over the Volvo’s failing muffler, “I found the Octo-Vin.” “We need ice!” April laughs. We’re pretty used to these situations – we kind of live for them.
There’s a little cloud of dust as we turn down the dirt road toward Hemlock Preserve, obscuring the brambly ditch weeds and meandering path for a few minutes, but we make the turn toward Sue Watt’s estate and everything becomes clear. Two straight rows of pale pebbles guides our tire, a manicured strip of hyperactive green grass down the center. Our kitchen – a ten-by-ten foot tent that we use during farmers markets along with a propane-powered set of turkey fryers and a few folding tables smartly lined with Epicurean cutting boards – is pretty much ready for action and we pull up to unload. I leave the Volvo empty handed in order to get the lay of the land and walk toward the barn.
The barn – white, stately, adorned with Rhododendrons – I haven’t seen it for a few months, when it was closed off for the season. Now it is in full blossom. It is elegant and country, mismatched and perfectly appointed, it is the Henri Matisse of barns – it is natural but it is secretly, expertly organized. Every nook and cranny is a still life. The sunlight is somehow captured in the vaulted holiness of the barn’s wooden ceiling arches, and I get the feeling I am smelling hay from pre-war Minnesota. There is twinkling from the silverware and creaking from the floorboards. Ned has started to tune up his guitar and starts playing a Pavement song gently to himself. This is perfect. I think this to myself, but I’m saying it out loud, and everyone else is saying it too.
The food that follows has no choice – it is also perfect, as are the guests, the drinks, the wacky chauffeur, the soft ice cream, the distant lightening. This place is like that – inexplicably, effortlessly glorious. The day’s preparations, anxieties, arguments and oversights have vanished into the evening, drifting down the meadow into the St. Louis River Valley with the embers of our bonfire, soaked up and overturned by our guests and their laughter.
We invite you to join us once again to Hemlock Preserve. Dinner will be served – fried chicken and fixings – as well as drinks and dessert. We figure we all deserve a little Northern Comfort.

Hemlock Preserve barn with table by Sue Watt, dinner by Northern Waters Smokehaus, and menu cards by Flo.

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Top Five Boursin Recipe Ideas

boursin jars

Boursin is a versatile, flavorful, creamy addition to many meals. We started making Boursin at Northern Waters Smokehaus on a whim and it has now become one of our most popular cheese case items. Over the years, we’ve learned to concoct some simple dishes with our Boursin, adding an herbal, lemony lift to veggies and meats alike. Our Mother’s Day Gift Box is a favorite – the combination of smoked Sockeye salmon, crispy crackers, and fluffy cheese is an elegant, binge-worthy snack. Here are the top 5 Boursin recipe ideas (so far) for you. For more exact recipes, email creative [@] nwsmokehaus.com and we’ll do our best to get you cooking with Boursin to mathematical perfection!

Five time-tested, Smokehaus-approved recipe ideas for our Boursin:

#5: Boursin and Endive Bites

Belgian endive is almost always available at the grocery store, even here in the Great White North. These delicate little torpedoes of green are crisp, sweet, and very slightly bitter – a perfect foil for creamy, citric, floral Boursin. Simply trim the endive ends and gently separate the leaves. You will find a delicate little shovel – a great conduit for many mediums, and excellent for a dollop of Boursin. Use a teaspoon to smear the Boursin or get fancy and pipe it (with a pastry bag or clipped plastic one – up to you). We garnish ours with jolly little Sweetie Drops, or pickled Peruvian peppers, but feel free to use your own favorite garnish – paprika, parsley, anything pickled – or go au naturale and let the bite speak for itself.

#4: Steak and Boursin

What can we say? Compound butter + grilled beef = heaven on earth. Useful on any cut, but especially the fatty, interesting ones, like New York strip, Boursin will be the equivalent of a Valentino gown on Sophia Loren: it will cling to it in all the right places. Salt and pepper your steak, let it get to room temperature, cook it over or under hot flame for your desired temperature, let it rest for 5 minutes, dollop with a Tablespoon of Boursin, and let rest for at least another 5 minutes. Devour, with or without starch to sop up the resulting incredible juices.

#3 Chicken and Boursin Surprise

The real surprise here is that this doesn’t exist at every fast-casual American eatery on the planet. This is a simple yet luxurious meal that is quick to construct, satisfying, and actually makes great leftovers for sandwiches. Pound chicken breasts to a ½ inch thickness, spread an even layer of Boursin approximately ¼ inch thick,  and add a layer of cured muscle meat, like prosciutto, jamon serrano, or copa (if you live near the Smokehaus deli or are a member of our Smokehaus of the Month Club, we recommend asking for our Speck or Lonzino). Roll the cutlets into wheels, secure with toothpicks, sprinkle with salt and pepper, dredge in flour, and fry in good oil until golden and cooked through (165 degrees). Great with buttered, Parmiganno’d pasta, roasted asparagus, or sliced after cooling and served on a leafy green salad.

#2 Boursin Toast

Inspired by a local business that boldly decided to exclusively offer coffee and toast (we miss you, JPH!), we salute the simplicity of a crusty, magnificent slab of Duluth sourdough stuffed into the nearest (and most accommodating) toaster, grilled to pedal-to-the-metal blackish-brownish, and smeared with enough Boursin that it qualifies as a “barge.” Extra points for those who first slather their toast with butter, but enough Boursin will certainly do the trick. Top with sun-ripened tomatoes, crumbled bacon or pancetta, a raisin smiley face (probably gross, but pretty kitschy, no?), or nothing at all.

#1 Boursin and Smoked Turkey Sandwiches

At the risk of redundancy, we here at the Smokehaus are really into sandwiches. We live sandwiches from the moment we flick on our meat case lights and start cutting cucumbers in the morning to the end of the day when Jerry ushers out the last stray customer with a flourish of his vest and stamp on their sandwich card. We fully realize that many would place a steak at #1 on this list, especially considering that a lowly turkey sandwich had secured the top ranking. But we are not many. We are sandwich people. Our original intent for Boursin was on a turkey sandwich, but we quickly realized the delicious nature of said sandwich would backfire and we would have to hire a whole separate person in the summers to exclusively make Boursin to keep up with demand. So here is the catalyst for the hundreds of cute little medicine jars of Boursin we sell, revealed at last, The Green Meanie: buy or make some naan (we use Stonefire, and it’s really good), and warm it in the oven. Slather liberally with Boursin. Aim the point of your naan to the left to orient the sandwich. In a vertical line down the center, place an even row of cucumber slices, basil leaves, pickled jalapenos, and as much smoked turkey as you like (but don’t get crazy, you need to roll this up). Starting at the wide end, roll the sandwich, tucking stray ingredients as you go. Slice in half and savor a Smokehaus secret.

 

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The Art of Gift Giving

Let’s face it, not everyone is good at giving gifts. Remember that Seinfeld episode? The one where Jerry gives Elaine 182 dollars to her snarky response, but then weeps when given a beautiful wooden bench she asked for, complete with a Yeats-quoted card (from Kramer, of all people).  Now, there’s the art of gift giving.

“Think where man’s glory most begins and ends and say my glory was I had such a friend.” – Yeats

At the Smokehaus, we appreciate fine and thoughtful things, and pairing certain items together for special gift boxes throughout the year brings us great joy. We know many of our mail order customers have been to the Canal Park deli on a special trip to Duluth. They have fond memories of being in our small shop, of traipsing around the Northland for summer fun and whimsy, all coupled with the mouth-watering goodness that filled their bellies and their memories. And perhaps, you’ve thought about how to bring the feelings of the Smokehaus into your own dining room.

We do understand giving the gift of specialty food mailed right to your door is a luxury, and that’s why we send the freshest product, handle and package each item with care and respect, and are sure to email or call you with any questions about your order or desired delivery time. (We even accept custom gift box orders.) We hope you feel giddy when you receive these special boxes of smoked delicacies. And we hope you will send a gift box to a friend someday, or a mother, for a special occasion, or to share together over beers on the deck, recounting all the hilarity and inside jokes from that last trip up the shore.

Gift Boxes Courtesy of the Smokehaus

Order Mother’s Day Gift Boxes by Wednesday, May 10th to ensure delivery before Mother’s Day.

Order Father’s Day Gift Boxes by Wednesday, June 14th, to ensure delivery before Father’s Day.

Order Northern Bagel Sandwich Kits anytime for that special someone, or special people. The Northern Bagel has been featured on our menu since 2001.

How many times have you been to the Canal Park deli? Who did you come with? Leave comments above.

Cheers, friends! And Happy Gift Giving!

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Spring Pasta with Smoked Salmon Recipe

What could be more appropriate to the weather tug-of-war that is Springtime in Duluth, MN than an ample plate of pasta festooned with smoked salmon?  Recently, while filtering through an inbox of email nonsense (due Friday? How about next Monday?) a thrilling word was on a subject line: *( and Rosé) – and we knew a new smoked salmon recipe was in order.

Humans, we made it through another winter. There’s something in the air — maybe it’s the sudden sunlight and early storms? Maybe it’s the oomph in people’s steps? Let’s just say we are starting to dream about Rosé.

Whatever your reason might be, we are eager to sip, cook with friends and relax.

The cocktail recipe inspired us to make something light and citrusy. We paired our favorite Haus-smoked salmon with an affordable, fresh and fruity Rosé (we substituted  a bottle of sparkling Rosé for La Vieille Ferme 2015 ).
* If you don’t have a bottle of St. Germain liqueur just laying around in your house, the chilled Rosé is still quite the treat.

However, that liquor is like liquid gold. Use it today, use it tomorrow, use it forever.

 

Ingredients

½ lb Smoked Alaskan sockeye salmon, cubed

1/2 Shallot, diced

4 Cloves of garlic, diced

1 T Cracked black pepper

1/2 Lemon, zested and juiced

1 C Fresh parsley, chopped

10 Asparagus stalks

228 g (two servings worth) Dry angel hair pasta

Canola oil or olive oil for cooking

Salt to taste

3 T Butter  

4 T (¼ cup) of White wine (Sauvignon Blanc works great. It’s light, dry, herbal & floral, which will create a nice dimension).

 

Directions –

After getting your mise en place all ready (aka prepping your ingredients), get  salted water boiling and cook pasta al dente, strain, toss in 1 T (or so – enough to prevent sticking) olive oil. Save 2 Tablespoons of pasta water –  the gluten will be useful for the sauce.

Heat 1 T of oil and 1 T of butter over medium-high heat. Lightly salt and cook the asparagus until they are nearly tender, 4-5 minutes. Remove the asparagus and set them aside for later. We want the asparagus to be a little undercooked here because we will be adding them back in later.

If the pan seems dry, add a little bit of olive oil to the same pan and sweat shallots over medium heat until they are nearly translucent. Add another 1 T of butter and add the garlic and salmon. Cook, stirring, for a few minutes to combine flavors.

Add  wine and the pasta water you saved. Add the rest of your ingredients (black pepper, lemon zest and juice). Toss in the asparagus and add another tablespoon of butter. Let your ingredients simmer for about 5-7 minutes until the sauce reduces and becomes slightly thickened and reduced.


Toss in the pasta and add the fresh parsley. Mix and serve!

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Northern Bagel Sandwich Kit

Some food bites transport you.

 

Creamy whipped scallion cream cheese, perfectly smoked, flakey Traditional Salmon and a golden (with a slight hint of sweetness) Lake Superior Bakehouse Bagel.

Can you remember the anticipation while waiting in line?

Can you remember the list of to-dos and must-sees while visiting the western tip of Lake Superior?

Do you remember avoiding making eye contact with the Seagulls (or lake birds)?

 

 

This May, we will help transport you to the unsalted sea. You can bring a friend along and share a Northern Bagel anywhere in the United States.
No luggage required. 

Coming Soon