Posted on

Introducing …

We have officially become fancy. After years of cardboard and stickers, we have made a great leap forward and now offer beautiful wood-burned wooden crates, which come standard with our Salami Gift Box and are straight-up for sale in the Duluth storefront.

 The crates are hinged; perfect for that cassette tape collection, spare socks, or, as one of our regular customers announced, “shotgun shells.”
We like them for smoked fish and salami. I bet you all will, too.

All of our delightful platters and bites on our new catering menu will include one of these cute little keepsakes, as well!

Posted on

April’s Sweet Potato Hash

Crispy, sweet, soft, and savory – if you treat a sweet potato right, you get results. And by “right,” I mean adding Smokehaus bacon and fried sage. April came up with this recipe recently in what can only be considered a fit of genius. Try it on Thanksgiving, on Christmas, or on any given weekend with a couple of poached eggs. 

Aprils Sweet Potato Hash

Ingredients:

3 medium-large sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1” cubes

2 Tbsp olive oil

1 Tbsp butter

1 medium yellow onion, small-diced

¼ lb bacon, cut into small cubes

1 bunch of fresh sage

Kosher salt, to taste

Fresh-ground black pepper, to taste

Directions:

Put a large pot of salted water on to boil. Once boiling, add the sweet potatoes and cook until just fork-tender, but not soft. Heat 1 Tbsp of the oil in a large, heavy skillet on medium. Add the sage and fry, gently flipping over, until it is crisp (this won’t take long – about 3-5 minutes). Remove the crispy sage to a plate and, while still warm, sprinkle with a little salt.

In the same skillet, add the bacon and onion and cook until the onion is soft, about 10 minutes. Remove mixture and drain off most of the bacon fat, but leave a teaspoon or so to flavor the potatoes. Add the butter, and once melted, add the sweet potatoes in an even layer.

Allow the sweet potatoes to brown on one side and then re-incorporate the onions and bacon. Cook all the ingredients until desired crispiness is reached with the potatoes. Salt and pepper to taste and garnish with the fried sage.

Posted on

Duluth Maple Pumpkin Pie

We use Duluth maple syrup in this pumpkin pie recipe – it is harvested right up the hill by one of our salmon fisherman, Dave Rogotzke, and his wife and children. The addition of maple syrup gives the pie a mellow sweetness, and the fresh ginger and black pepper really make it sing.

Duluth Maple Pumpkin Pie

1 9” Flaky Pie crust

2 large eggs

15 ounces pumpkin puree

2 cups of heavy cream

½ cup of locally-made maple syrup

¾ tsp cinnamon

½ tsp grated fresh ginger

Pinch of ground nutmeg

Pinch of ground cloves

Pinch of fresh-ground black pepper

½ tsp kosher salt

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees, adjusting an oven rack to the lowest position.

Whisk together all the ingredients with 1 cup of the cream.  Pour the mixture into the crust and bake on the lowest oven rack, on a baking sheet, for 60-70 minutes or until the center is set.

Remove from oven and let cool completely before serving – overnight is optimal. To serve, whip the remaining cup of cream (add sugar, if desired) and give the slices a dollop.

Posted on

Holiday Gatherings

The Smokehaus loves a good party. As long as there is a fire and a beasty to throw on it, we will be there.

Warmth and pork – with the occasional vegetable thrown in – November (and December, and January) seems built for celebrating. The abbreviation of daylight seems to hasten midnight behavior: gluttony, affection, caterwalling, wrestling, and dreaming of strawberries.

       

             

It is perhaps this season, when summer is abruptly yanked off the stage by winter’s frosty cane, that we begin to fully grasp the importance of friends, a fire, a meal, and once again utilize the mysteries of a long darkness.

 

Happy November, dear readers. It’s gonna be a great winter. 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted on

Brussels Sprouts with Chorizo

This recipe has been known to convert the pickiest of vegetable-phobes; as usual, the incorporation of meat is just the thing to do the trick.

Adapted from Saveur, our Chorizo really makes it sing. 

Smokehaus Brussels Sprouts

2 lbs fresh Brussels sprouts

1/4 lb Chorizo, small-diced

2 Tbsp olive oil

Kosher salt, to taste

3-4 shallots, small-diced

3 cloves of garlic, minced

Fresh-ground black pepper, to taste

 

Directions:

Put a large pot of salted water on to boil. Trim and halve the sprouts. When the water comes to a boil, drop in the sprouts and cook until just tender, 7-10 minutes. Drain and let cool.

Heat 1 Tbsp of the oil in a large, heavy skillet on medium-high. Add the Chorizo and brown. Add the shallots and cook until soft, then add the garlic and cook until soft; about 2 more minutes. Remove this mixture to a bowl.

Turn up the heat on the skillet and add remaining 1 Tbsp of oil. Add the Brussels sprouts and cook until browned and tender. Incorporate the Chorizo mixture and add salt and pepper to taste.