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Updated No-Contact Pickup FAQs

For the safety of our staff and customers, our doors remain closed. Our space is simply too small to socially distance. But good news! We continue to provide everything our little shop offers through no-contact local delivery and no-contact pickups outside our doors. And there’s the added bonus of not having to wait in line! Instead, think of it as a “virtual line.” While you wait, we encourage you to explore all that our beautiful Canal Park location has to offer.

We are incredibly grateful for the amount of support, encouraging words, and positive feedback we have received from our customers. Our love for food has not faded and we are as committed as ever to providing safe, exceptional customer service.

Have any questions about how and where to find your pickup order? Here are a few answers:

How do I place a pickup order? 

You can place it online or you can call us at 218-724-7307. We recommend placing your order online for the fastest turnaround. 

How do I pay?

Payments are taken as usual online. If you’re calling to place an order, we will take your payment information over the phone. 

Can I tip? 

Yes! Both online and over the phone. Everyone appreciates it. 

How will I know when my order is ready?

If you order online you will receive an email with the pickup time. We will give you an estimate over the phone. When your order is ready it will be placed in our no-contact pickup zone.

Where do I pickup my order?

Our no-contact pickup zone is located just outside our doors. There you will find a rack with your order. Your order will have your name written on the bag. 

If you have any questions, please give us a call at 218-724-7307.

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NO CONTACT PICK-UP ZONE

It’s a Spring that we will always remember. This is our current new odd reality. We miss sharing bad (and good) jokes with our customers. We also miss explaining the difference between wet and dry-cured pepperoni or what kippering is.

While some restaurants across Minnesota are beginning to reopen at 50% capacity, for the safety of our staff and customers, our doors remain closed. Our space is simply too small to socially distance responsibly. But good news! We will continue to provide everything our little shop offers through delivery and no-contact pickups outside on our deck.

We are incredibly grateful for the amount of support, encouraging words, and positive feedback we have received from our customers over the last few months.

Our love for food has not faded. We are committed to providing exceptional customer service. We will pivot and adjust to the challenges that arise. We will continue to ensure that our operations and policies are sustainable while maintaining the highest safety possible.

How to place a pickup? 

You can place it online or you can call us. We recommend placing your order online for the fastest turnaround. 

How do I pay?

If you’re calling to place an order, we will take your payment over the phone. 

Can I tip? 

Yes! Over the phone. Everyone appreciates it. 

How do I know when my order is ready?

We will give you an estimate over the phone. When your order is ready it will be placed in our new no contact pickup zone.

Where do I pickup my order?

Our no contact pickup zone is located on our deck facing the DeWitt-Seitz parking lot. You’ll see a large white tent. Your order will have your name written on the bag. 

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5 Things Feature: Corned Bison

This week’s all about Corned Bison. With St. Patrick’s Day falling on a Tuesday, we anticipate a lot of Sunday slow-cookings of corned meats, potatoes, cabbage, and such, amongst Irish-American and Irish-American adjacent families and St. Patty’s enthusiasts alike.

Since it’s been a busy week for our business, this 5 Things we’ll forego the retrospective on our week—or abridge it: it was busy, we’re a little short on staff and still looking to hire some cool, hardworking individuals. Send resumes to greg@nwsmokehaus.com—and instead answer a few common questions about our Corned Bison.

What does “corned” even mean and how many cobs are involved?

“Corned” refers to treatment of meat with “corns” of large-grain rock salt, often with other spices such as coriander, cinnamon, mustard seed, ginger, and the like. Unfortunately, there are zero cobs involved, unless you’re making the stock for a corned bison and sauerkraut soup. If so, cobs away!

Fun fact: our Corned Bison is one of a small handful of our meat products that never touch the smoker. After it cures for several days, it is instead cooked in our Alto-Shaam oven, which is designed to hold moisture and maintain exact temperatures for a long time.

Why corned bison?

Bison is delicious. Bison tastes wild and powerful and natural. It’s lower in cholesterol and higher in protein than beef. The bison we use comes from North American Bison. It’s hormone-free, antibiotic-free, regionally sourced from a cooperative of smaller, family-owned ranches, and the bison themselves live great lives and are humanely harvested.

How should I eat corned bison?

This would be a good start. Ignore the “beef” in the title—we used to primarily make bison pastrami and corned beef, but now we’ve flipped the script—this recipe is a great use of a whole shoulder of NWS Corned Bison. If you’re still thinking about cobs, I’d advise stripping an ear of corn of its kernels, then tossing both the kernels and the cob in with the bison and kraut. Remove cobs before serving.

Another option is something like this substituting corned bison for the Smoked Berkshire Ham. Trust us, it’ll be good.

If you want to skip the grueling work, you can enjoy a similar experience with our ‘06 sandwich with corned bison, in our deli, or via delivery, if you feel like staying home and avoiding the looming pandemic.

Where can I get a good deal on corned bison?

Glad you asked! We’re running a mail order special: Buy a whole shoulder of NWS Corned Bison and receive an included pound of our Hausmade Sauerkraut. It’s a perfect match.

Is there anything else I should be excited about, specifically referring to corned bison?

Wow, you’re just asking all of the questions I currently want to answer, and in an eerily similar fashion to the way I would phrase it. There is!

In a couple short months, we’ll be debuting a new corned bison sandwich, alongside an exciting (and secret! Don’t pry.) collaboration with our neighbors at (link to Duluth Pack website) Duluth Pack.


Now get out there (or stay in!) and have a safe, healthy weekend. You deserve it. And have a spooky Friday the 13th ⊂(≖.≖⊂ )∘˚˳°

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Corned bison with roasted beet salad

Reheat Smokehaus corned bison:

Preheat your oven to 275 degrees F.

In deep roasting pan, place corned bison

Fill with water until the corned beef is submerged.

Cover and place the pan in the oven.

Check every 45 minutes to see if liquid needs replenishing and use a thermometer to temp the corned bison. 

Continue this process until internal temp reaches 165.

After the appropriate amount of time has passed, pull pan out and allow to cool for 20 minutes.

After cooling time has passed, pull corned beef out of pan to carve. Remember to always carve against the grain. Cut into 1/8th – 1/4 inch slices.

Roasting the beets:

4 beets (either red or golden)

4 Tablespoons of olive oil 

Salt and black pepper

Heavy duty tinfoil.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Scrub beets under water and trim off any tops.

In a large bowl, toss all four beets with 4 tablespoons of olive oil and season with salt and pepper. 

Individually wrap seasoned beet in tinfoil. 

Place all four wrapped beets directly on the oven rack.

Roast for 60 minutes. 

Unwrap beets and poke with a knife to check tenderness. If the knife does not cut with ease, place the beets back in the oven for another 10 minutes. 

Once knife tender, unwrap all four beets and let cool for 20-30 minutes. Next use a paper town to scrub off the skins of the beets.

Cut beets into wedges and set aside.

Salad

4 oz container of arugula

4 oz container of spinach.

2 T maple syrup (we prefer Simple Gifts maple syrup, harvested in Duluth by Dave Rogotzke.)

2 ounces of aged sheep’s milk cheese, shaved thin. We prefer Friesago from Shepherd’s Way Farm (sold in shop)

In a large bowl, combine arugula, spinach, roasted beets, and cheese. Toss and drizzle with maple syrup.